CES: Nvidia Touts Tegra 4, Gaming Device

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) - The 2013 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas officially opens tomorrow. But some big announcements are already making news today.

Such as word from Nvidia ( NVDA), maker of high-end, ARM ( ARMH) -based processors, that its next-generation chip is on the way.

The Tegra 4 is being touted as "the world's fastest mobile processor" for notebooks, smartphones and tablets. They're calling it a quad-core device, but it really has five inner cores with that low-power, fifth core which is designed to maximize battery life.

There's no word on actual chip speeds, but we do know that the Tegra 4 does have more than 70 graphics cores. Unlike the competition (from Qualcomm ( QCOM) ) this new, fourth-generation processor does not include 4G/LTE capabilities.

Nvidia also announced a new, portable gaming device which will run on a Tegra 4. Dubbed Project Shield, it's also described as having a 5-inch touchscreen and capable of providing next-generation super-resolution video, via an HDMI connection, to any of the new (super expensive) "4K" TV sets being announced at CES, this week.

Keep up with the latest news coming out of CES with TheStreet's live blog:

--Written by Gary Krakow in New York.

>To submit a news tip, send an email to: tips@thestreet.com.

Gary Krakow is TheStreet's senior technology correspondent.

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