Misuse or abuse of oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets by crushing, chewing, snorting, or injecting the dissolved product will result in the uncontrolled delivery of the opioid and pose a significant risk that could result in overdose and death.

Contact local state professional licensing board or state controlled substances authority for information on how to prevent and detect abuse or diversion of this product.

Life Threatening Respiratory DepressionRespiratory depression is the primary risk of oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Respiratory depression, if not immediately recognized and treated, may lead to respiratory arrest and death. Respiratory depression from opioids is manifested by a reduced urge to breathe and a decreased rate of respiration, often associated with a “sighing” pattern of breathing (deep breaths separated by abnormally long pauses). Carbon dioxide (CO 2) retention from opioid-induced respiratory depression can exacerbate the sedating effects of opioids. Management of respiratory depression may include close observation, supportive measures, and use of opioid antagonists, depending on the patient’s clinical status.

While serious, life-threatening, or fatal respiratory depression can occur at any time during the use of oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets, the risk is greatest during the initiation of therapy or following a dose increase. Closely monitor patients for respiratory depression when initiating therapy with oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets and following dose increases. Instruct patients against use by individuals other than the patient for whom oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets were prescribed and to keep oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets out of the reach of children, as such inappropriate use may result in fatal respiratory depression.

To reduce the risk of respiratory depression, proper dosing and titration of oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets are essential. Overestimating the oxymorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets dose when converting patients from another opioid product can result in fatal overdose with the first dose. Respiratory depression has also been reported with use of modified-release opioids when used as recommended and not misused or abused.

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