Economists and lawmakers warn that without an agreement, the U.S. could slip back into a recession. And they say that small businesses have the most to lose.

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American Airlines rolls out new fare structure

American Airlines is changing the way it charges you to fly.

American will charge up to $88 more per round trip for passengers who want a basic ticket that includes checking baggage or changing a reservation. Currently the airline levies separate fees for those and other extras for everyone except premium passengers.

American says the new fare structure is a response to customer complaints about fees for changing reservations. American will still sell a basic fare without protection against add-on fees for the "passenger who is just looking for the cheapest way to get to where they've got to go."

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Your drink: now the most pleasant part of flying

Airlines have found a way to take the edge off the stress of flying and make a few extra bucks along the way with fancy new cocktails, craft beers and elegant wines.

The drinks advertised in the back of in-flight magazines â¿¿ or on sleek seatback touchscreens â¿¿ are starting to resemble those at the hottest nightclubs.

Flying isn't what it used to be. Long lines, ever-changing security rules and limited overhead bin space have all made traveling much more stressful. It's no wonder many passengers look for a little escape. Airlines â¿¿ who created much of this anxiety â¿¿ are happy to oblige.

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Most Googled in 2012: Whitney, PSY, Sandy

The world's attention wavered between the tragic and the silly in 2012. Along the way, millions of people searched the Web to find out about a royal princess, the latest iPad, and a record-breaking skydiver.

Whitney Houston was the "top trending" search of the year, according to a Google report. People searched for news about Houston's accidental drowning in a bathtub in February.

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