6 Technology Companies Jim Cramer Is Avoiding

On CNBC Mad Money, Jim Cramer was net-bullish in the second-half of the month of November. Of the 91 companies mentioned, Cramer was positive on 58 companies and negative on 33 of them. Companies Cramer was bearish about are worth a second-look. They are a starting point either for companies to avoid, or are approaching a more-than reasonable valuation.

Most of the companies receiving negative mention traded downward over the last few months. Only Nokia (NOK) broke above the $2-range to close at $3.26. Nokia’s new Windows Phone 8 Lumia device was sold out in Germany. This fueled optimism for investors hoping the new device will gain market share. Investors should have a longer-time frame for Nokia: market share growth will take many quarters, not many weeks.

Microsoft (MSFT) and Nokia’s Symbian lost market share between July and October 2012:

 

1. Baidu, Inc. ( BIDU, Earnings, Analysts, Financials): was a company Cramer did not like. The company reported surprisingly weak results last quarter.

 

 

2. Hewlett-Packard Company ( HPQ, Earnings, Analysts, Financials): reported a weak quarter. The catalyst for the sell-off in its shares was when HP accused Autonomy executives of fraudulent accounting. Fundamentally, HP needs to improve sales in its printing division, and increase profits for Windows 8-based computers.

 

3. NVIDIA Corporation ( NVDA, Earnings, Analysts, Financials):  is a graphics card maker. The company reported very good earnings last quarter, but gave a tepid outlook. NVidia supplies graphics processors for Android-based devices, but relies heavily on computer sales. The company announced it is paying dividends for the first time.

 

4. Research In Motion Limited ( RIMM, Earnings, Analysts, Financials): is a company Cramer is still bearish on. Shares have nearly doubled already. Nothing fundamentally different has changed: Blackberry 10 continues to be the next-generation device that will be released next year.

 

5. Intel Corporation ( INTC, Earnings, Analysts, Financials): shares are at a 52-week low. Investors were caught off guard with the announcement that its CEO will retire next year. Intel shares pay a yield of 4.6%. Although revenues rely on computer sales, which were weak last quarter, Windows 8 should still gain traction over time. If last quarter turned out to be a consumers holding back on upgrading, Windows 8 should help Intel shares.

 

 

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