Consumers ran the table on mobile. It was really quite incredible to see how amazingly fast so much of the world moved to using apps on mobile phones. Some companies either got lucky, recognized the trend or -- thanks to a mix of luck and recognition -- had platforms ready-made for mobile.

Think Twitter. And, despite its recent brain farts in the fight over royalties, think Pandora ( P).

Let's hope the royalty missteps do not sink the company because Pandora, as a platform, remains the real deal. It simply could not have missed the move to mobile. It smacked Pandora upside the head the day Apple introduced iPhone. Pandora adoption skyrocketed because listeners could now take Pandora with them wherever they went.

You have to give Facebook the benefit of the doubt for missing in this respect. Different platform. Less visibility into the trend. And even if you do not give Mark Zuckerberg the BOD, let bygones be bygones. Move forward or be left behind.

The things Facebook has only begun to do with its platform are mind-boggling in terms of the revenue the company can generate. The notion of "gifting" items like iTunes gift cards alone makes this thing a $15 stock for goodness sake.

You click "gift," the recipient receives a message, he or she interacts with Facebook, heads over to Apple, buys some songs and the relationship is sealed. Next time, the recipient might be the gift giver. And so on and so forth.

$100 for this thing -- thanks to a mixture of momentum, a change in market sentiment and massive revenue growth, particularly in mobile, over the next 12-24 months, not to mention profitability -- is absolutely not crazy. Get ready for blowout earnings reports. Facebook's lack of guidance spells bear trap. This thing will absolutely fly on a meaningful earnings beat.

Folks who refuse to look won't know what hit them. Meantime, Facebook longs will have a Merry Christmas, Baby (any excuse to work Springsteen into a column!).

Rocco Pendola is TheStreet's Director of Social Media. Pendola's daily contributions to TheStreet frequently appear on CNBC and at various top online properties, such as Forbes.

If you liked this article you might like

Shorting Facebook; Top Rope Elbow Drop on Wells Fargo: Doug Kass' Views

Why Amazon's Reported Smart Glasses Might Be Just a Niche Product -- For Now

PayPal's Venmo Gets Ready to Take on Apple

How PayPal's CEO Uses Military Level Karate to Succeed in Business

Yes, PayPal CEO Actively Practices Martial Arts