Bernanke Warns of Fiscal Cliff, Reminds of Debt Limit

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke warned Tuesday that the stakes are high in finding solutions to the so-called fiscal cliff.

Bernanke, who spoke this afternoon at the Economic Club of New York, said he believes the "realization" of all of the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that would go into effect at the beginning of 2013 would pose a substantial threat to the slow recovery of the U.S. economy.

The Fed chairman also reminded the crowd that the United States needs to increase the federal debt limit again early in 2013. The debt ceiling became a big issue for investors in the summer of 2011 when political posturing before a deal was struck led Standard & Poor's to lower the U.S. credit rating to AA+ from AAA after prolonged disagreement in Congress.

" Early in the new year it will be necessary to approve an increase in the federal debt limit to avoid any possibility of a catastrophic default on the nation's Treasury securities and other obligations," Bernanke said in the speech. "A failure to reach a timely agreement this time around could impose even heavier economic and financial costs."

Obama and Boehner were joined last Friday by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and the president told reporters that he was confident Congress would reach a balanced approach to deficit reduction.

But some analysts have suggested that fiscal cliff negotiations could go the way of Europe -- kicking the proverbial can down the road.

"You're going to get something that kicks this down the road into the new Congress next year," said Doug Roberts, chief investment strategist at ChannelCapitalResearch.com. "I don't think you're going to get anything comprehensive, but you may get some type of a temporary fix that kind of allows both sides to declare victory, and at that point address it next year."

However the discussions play out, Bernanke has reiterated time and again the importance for Congress to reach some sort of deal on the budget without allowing for the full fiscal cliff.

Bernanke said he believed the potential fallout is widely appreciated by legislators now, and he said a credible plan would eventually transition the economy to a stronger condition with full employment.

Below is the transcript of Bernanke's remarks on the fiscal cliff:

What are these looming challenges? First, the Congress and the Administration will need to protect the economy from the full brunt of the severe fiscal tightening at the beginning of next year that is built into current law--the so-called fiscal cliff. The realization of all of the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff, absent offsetting changes, would pose a substantial threat to the recovery--indeed, by the reckoning of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and that of many outside observers, a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into recession. Second, early in the new year it will be necessary to approve an increase in the federal debt limit to avoid any possibility of a catastrophic default on the nation's Treasury securities and other obligations. As you will recall, the threat of default in the summer of 2011 fueled economic uncertainty and badly damaged confidence, even though an agreement ultimately was reached. A failure to reach a timely agreement this time around could impose even heavier economic and financial costs.

As fiscal policymakers face these critical decisions, they should keep two objectives in mind. First, as I think is widely appreciated by now, the federal budget is on an unsustainable path. The budget deficit, which peaked at about 10 percent of GDP in 2009 and now stands at about 7 percent of GDP, is expected to narrow further in the coming years as the economy continues to recover. However, the CBO projects that, under a plausible set of policy assumptions, the budget deficit would still be greater than 4 percent of GDP in 2018, assuming the economy has returned to its potential by then. Moreover, under the CBO projection, the deficit and the ratio of federal debt to GDP would subsequently return to an upward trend.9 Of course, we should all understand that long-term projections of ever-increasing deficits will never actually come to pass, because the willingness of lenders to continue to fund the government can only be sustained by responsible fiscal plans and actions. A credible framework to set federal fiscal policy on a stable path--for example, one on which the ratio of federal debt to GDP eventually stabilizes or declines--is thus urgently needed to ensure longer-term economic growth and stability.

Even as fiscal policymakers address the urgent issue of longer-run fiscal sustainability, they should not ignore a second key objective: to avoid unnecessarily adding to the headwinds that are already holding back the economic recovery. Fortunately, the two objectives are fully compatible and mutually reinforcing. Preventing a sudden and severe contraction in fiscal policy early next year will support the transition of the economy back to full employment; a stronger economy will in turn reduce the deficit and contribute to achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. At the same time, a credible plan to put the federal budget on a path that will be sustainable in the long run could help keep longer-term interest rates low and boost household and business confidence, thereby supporting economic growth today.

Coming together to find fiscal solutions will not be easy, but the stakes are high. Uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets, with adverse effects on the economy. Continuing to push off difficult policy choices will only prolong and intensify these uncertainties. Moreover, while the details of whatever agreement is reached to resolve the fiscal cliff are important, the economic confidence of both market participants and the general public likely will also be influenced by the extent to which our political system proves able to deliver a reasonable solution with a minimum of uncertainty and delay. Finding long-term solutions that can win sufficient political support to be enacted may take some time, but meaningful progress toward this end can be achieved now if policymakers are willing to think creatively and work together constructively.

-- Written by Joe Deaux in New York.

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