Dell's in the Doldrums: Tech Weekly

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Earnings season is winding down, with a few notable names reporting this week. Dell ( DELL) offered a bleak tone, while Cisco ( CSCO) was slightly more upbeat on the state of its business.

The Round Rock, Texas-based PC maker reported adjusted third-quarter earnings of 39 cents a share, missing the Thomson Reuters analyst consensus of 40 cents.

Dell's revenue for the quarter was $13.7 billion, 11% lower than the year-earlier quarter and short of the $13.89 billion analysts polled by Thomson Reuters were expecting. The top line was pressured by falling desktop and mobility revenue.

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Dell is in the process of turning itself around, as it becomes less PC-centric, but the process is taking longer than expected.

Shares of Dell lost 5.9% over the course of the week to close at $8.84.

Cisco, on the other hand, beat Wall Street expectations, and sounded upbeat during its conference call relative to expectations.

The networking giant reported non-GAAP earnings of $2.57 billion, or 48 cents a share, on revenue of $11.88 billion, up from a year-ago equivalent profit of $2.32 billion, or 43 cents a share, on revenue of $11.27 billion. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters were looking for earnings of 46 cents a share on revenue of $11.77 billion.

Cisco Earnings: Live Blog Recap

Cisco provided healthy guidance, predicting revenue between $11.9 billion and $12.1 billion and earnings of 47 to 48 cents a share, as the company's long-term strategy seems to be working. The current consensus view calls for revenue of $12.06 billion and earnings of 48 cents a share.

Cisco enjoyed a strong week, gaining 6.96% to close at $17.99.

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