Watch A Short Video Demonstration: Http://www.microchip.com/get/U913 (Photo: Business Wire)

Microchip Technology Inc. (NASDAQ: MCHP), a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced its patented GestIC® technology, which enables the next dimension in intuitive, gesture-based, non-contact user interfaces for a broad range of end products. The configurable MGC3130 is the world’s first electrical-field (E-field)-based 3D gesture controller, offering low-power, precise, fast and robust hand position tracking with free-space gesture recognition.
Watch a short video demonstration: http://www.microchip.com/get/U913 (Photo: Business Wire)

Watch a short video demonstration: http://www.microchip.com/get/U913 (Photo: Business Wire)

Watch a short video demonstration: http://www.microchip.com/get/U913

View a brief presentation: http://www.microchip.com/get/NW48

With power consumption as low as 150 microwatts in its active sensing state, the MGC3130 enables always-on 3D gesture recognition—even for battery-powered products where power budgets are extremely tight. In fact, the MGC3130’s low-power design and variety of configurable power modes provide the lowest power consumption of any 3D sensing technology—up to 90% lower than camera-based gesture systems.

GestIC technology achieves the exceptionally high gesture-recognition rates required by today’s consumer products through its on-chip library—called the Colibri Suite—of intuitive and natural human gestures. The Colibri Suite combines a stochastic Hidden Markov model and x/y/z hand-position vectors to provide designers with a reliable set of recognized 3D hand and finger gestures that can be easily employed in their products. Examples include Wake-Up on Approach, Position Tracking, Flick Gestures, Circle Gestures and Symbol Gestures to perform functions such as on/off, open application, point, click, zoom, scroll, free-space mouseover and many others. Designers can use this library to get to market quickly and reduce development risks, by simply matching their system commands to Microchip’s extensive set of predetermined and proven gestures. Additionally, the chip provides developers the flexibility to utilize pre-filtered electrode signals for additional functionality in their applications.

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