The dramatic impact that repossessions can have on individuals spurred Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's government to create the task force on evictions, and the latest death will likely add pressure on the group to find solutions.

"We must find the most effective means to alleviate the situation experienced by people who are losing their homes," Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria said earlier this month.

On Thursday, the European Court of Justice's advocate general, Juliane Kokott, handed down a non-binding legal opinion that criticized Spanish legal rules regarding evictions, saying they were incompatible with European norms, according to Spanish media reports.

The ruling came in response to a query from a Spanish court on a 2011 lawsuit over an eviction due to an unpaid mortgage. Kokott said the Spanish system did not sufficiently protect consumers against possible abusive clauses in mortgage contracts.

An improvement in the property market is not expected anytime soon. The government predicts Spain's economy, which is now in recession, will not grow until 2014. Unemployment is at a staggering rate of 25 percent.

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