Our valuation of Lucasfilm is roughly comparable to the value we placed on Marvel when we announced that acquisition in 2009. Our Lucasfilm valuation is almost entirely driven by the Star Wars franchise, so any success from other franchises would provide upside to our base case. I realize it may be a challenge for you to quantify our opportunity given the limited amount of publicly available information. But to give you some perspective on the size of the Lucasfilm business-- in 2005, the year in which the most recent Star Wars film was released, Lucasfilm generated $550 million in operating income. We’ve taken a conservative approach in our valuation assumptions, including continued erosion of the home entertainment market, and we expect this acquisition to create value for our shareholders.

In terms of the impact on our financials, we expect the acquisition to be dilutive to our EPS by low single digit percentage points in fiscal 2013 and 2014 and become accretive to EPS in 2015.

Our capital allocation philosophy has been consistent since Bob took over as CEO. In addition to returning capital to shareholders, we have invested, both organically and through acquisitions, in high quality, branded content that can be seamlessly leveraged across our businesses. Our acquisition of Lucasfilm is entirely consistent with this strategy, and we’re incredibly excited by the prospect of building on Lucasfilm’s successful legacy to create significant value for our shareholders.

Editor's note: Video of Bob Iger and George Lucas: http://bit.ly/TSrYay

Photos/Multimedia Gallery Available: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/mmg.cgi?eid=50459808&lang=en

Copyright Business Wire 2010

If you liked this article you might like

Market Selloff Survival Strategies: Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap (Thurs 9/21/17)

Royal Caribbean Cruise Set to Sail Through Caribbean Hurricane Disasters?

Microsoft's New Xbox One X Shows It's Done Trying to Please Everyone

'The Handmaid's Tale' Emmy Win Is Really Big for Netflix

Stocks Dad Would Have Loved, And Why He Was Right