Citi has not been without its share of problems in Asia, notably Japan, which already is a stagnating economy. The bank has been penalized thrice by Japan's regulators for various violations in its retail banking and private banking operations. That led the bank to institute management changes in Japan and spin off the country into a separate operating unit.

In Korea, the company is facing "regulatory headwinds," Citi revealed on Monday. The bank said it is repositioning its operations in the country.

2.What Will Happen to the "Bad Bank": Pandit reorganized Citigroup into a good bank, Citicorp, that focused more on traditional lending activities and a bad bank, Citi Holdings, that held non-core assets that the bank was eager to exit after the crisis.

Here again, Citi has met Pandit's target. Consumer banking now accounts for 56% of its business compared to 28% in 1998.

And the bank has sold nearly 100 non-core businesses since 2008, reducing its "bad bank" Citi Holdings to less than 10% of its assets from a 40% share in 2008.

Corbat, who previously held the position of CEO of Citi Holdings, is widely credited with executing this strategy.

But within core banking, there is still room for improvement. According to a Wall Street Journal report citing people familiar with the matter, Pandit clashed with the board over "strategy and operating performance at businesses including the institutional clients group."

Citi has lagged its big bank peers in investment banking and trading, though in the third quarter, the bank delivered a superior performance in fixed income trading.

Making more credible market share gains in trading and investment banking might be a course of action for Corbat.

3. When will Citigroup return capital to shareholders: On the promise to return more capital to shareholders, Pandit clearly under-delivered.

Earlier this year, the Federal Reserve determined that the bank would not be able to sustain a severe shock to the economy if it pursued an aggressive buyback plan. This came as a surprise to Pandit, who had assured shareholders that the bank was in a position to return capital.

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