JP Morgan and Wells Fargo are two of the four "too-big-to-fail" money center banks with plenty of accounting flexibility to manage earnings expectations. Will revenues continue to be raised by write-offs of bad loans and reduced loan loss provisions? Will revenue be reduced because of lower Treasury yields?

Beware that bank stocks are up against multiyear highs but below their September QE3 reaction highs. Will there be a positive catalyst in the banking industry given the slowing economy here and abroad?

At the time of publication, Suttmeier had no positions in stocks mentioned.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor, separate from TheStreet's regular news coverage.

Richard Suttmeier has an engineering degree from Georgia Tech and a master of science from Brooklyn Poly. He began his career in the financial services industry in 1972 trading U.S. Treasury securities in the primary dealer community. In 1981 he formed the Government Bond Department at LF Rothschild and helped establish that firm as a primary dealer in 1986. Richard began writing market research in 1984 and held positions as market strategist at firms such as Smith Barney, William R Hough, Joseph Stevens, and Rightside Advisors. He joined www.ValuEngine.com in 2008 producing newsletters covering the U.S. capital markets, and a universe of more than 7,000 stocks. Richard employs a "buy and trade" investment strategy and can be reached at RSuttmeier@Gmail.com.

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