"Education is the foundation for progress and the fuel of ingenuity," said Freddy Boom, Public Sector Head for EMEA, Citi. "It enables people to succeed in an increasingly competitive world. For cities, it is a crucial differentiator in attracting high caliber talent who can drive prosperity and growth, talent we strive to recognize through the FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards."

The forum is the last in a series of events leading up to the FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards in December. It was devised to provide a platform for business and education leaders to discuss the latest trends and drivers, and exchange ideas to further uncover innovative approaches to tackling urban challenges in the field of education.

Citi offers a range of solutions from around the world to address the challenges facing the education sector in an inventive but realistic way. From cashless campus communities that are convenient for students to more efficient systems for student fee billing that lower costs for governments, city leaders can access the tools they need for education in their cities to succeed.

About the FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards

More than half the world’s population lives in cities today, a number which is expected to rise in the decades ahead. As a result, cities have a pressing need to address the challenges of urbanisation and find solutions that modernise infrastructure, improve efficiency, enhance quality of life and foster sustainable growth and development.

The FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards: Urban Ideas in Action, a global programme sponsored by Citi was developed to recognise individuals who have developed groundbreaking solutions to urban challenges that benefit cities, citizens and urban communities in the fields of education, energy, healthcare and infrastructure.

Criteria and metrics for the Awards have been developed by INSEAD, one of the world’s leading and largest graduate business schools. All entries will be reviewed by the FT and INSEAD for qualification. The judging panel will select finalists and winners. As sponsor, Citi will not review or judge submissions.

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