"In particular, the legislation restricts the ability of an injured worker to access necessary medical treatment and to receive adequate compensation if a worker is permanently disabled and cannot return to work at the same salary," Brad Chalk, president of the 700-member California Applicants' Attorneys Association, wrote lawmakers.

The reforms also would limit the role chiropractors so they would not be able to serve as a worker's primary care doctor after hitting a cap of 24 visits a year.

Kassie Donoghue, a chiropractor and director of government affairs for the California Chiropractic Association, said the cap is arbitrary and doesn't make sense because many of the cost increases are driven by prescription drugs and medical treatments. The association hopes to get that changed in further legislation.

___

Lin reported from Sacramento.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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