Employers are still posting fewer jobs than before the recession, when they advertised about 4.4 million a month.

In July, the number of available jobs fell in manufacturing, health care, and professional and business services, a category that includes engineers, accountants and lawyers.

The government's monthly employment report measures net hiring.

Tuesday's report, known as the Job Openings and Labor Turnover survey, shows the amount of hiring and firing that takes place in the U.S. each month. It provides more details than the monthly jobs report.

It also highlights one reason the job market remains weak. Layoffs have fallen steadily recently, but companies aren't stepping up hiring.

Layoffs fell to 1.6 million in July. That's the lowest level in the 10 years the government has tracked the data. It shows companies aren't cutting jobs, despite their worries about future growth. It's also likely why weekly applications for unemployment benefits have trended down recently.

But they aren't adding many either.

Overall, employers hired 4.2 million people in July, down from almost 4.3 million in the previous month. Before the recession, total hires routinely topped 5 million.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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