3D Printing Helped NASA Build A Next-generation Rover For Human-piloted Exploration Of Asteroids And, Eventually, Mars. (Photo: NASA)

(NASDAQ: SSYS) Stratasys released a video and case study today demonstrating how 3D printing helped 4-year old Emma Lavelle overcome the limitations of a congenital disorder, allowing her to use her arms for the first time.
Emma Lavelle conquered a congenital disorder and gained use of her arms with a custom robotic exoske ...

Emma Lavelle conquered a congenital disorder and gained use of her arms with a custom robotic exoskeleton. (Photo: Stratasys)

This press release has an accompanying Smart Marketing Page providing further details about the organization, products and services introduced below. You can access the Smart Marketing Page via the following link: https://smp.newshq.businesswire.com/pages/3d-printed-exoskeleton-lets-little-girl-lift-arms-play.

Using a Dimension 3D printer, researchers at the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Philadelphia were able to create what little Emma calls her “magic arms.” The device is a custom-designed robotic exoskeleton that enables her to conquer greatly limited joint mobility and underdeveloped muscles.

Follow this link to the video, case study, and details on Emma’s story.

3D printing is touching lives worldwide, in part because of its ability to deliver personalized solutions that tackle tough human challenges.

Engineering a Difference

3D printing is helping to break down barriers in man’s quest to solve some of its greatest challenges in society, science and healthcare. On the Stratasys Facebook page throughout the month of August the company is sharing stories of how designers, engineers and educators are using 3D printing for healing, exploration and teaching.

Additional videos, pictures and stories on the Stratasys Facebook page will include the use of 3D printing to bring renewable energy to remote populations in developing countries, NASA’s development of a human-piloted rover to explore Mars, and 3D printing’s role in drawing a new generation to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, including underprivileged students traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields.

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