Corinthian Colleges Stock Falls On Unusually High Volume (COCO)

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Corinthian Colleges (Nasdaq: COCO) is trading at unusually high volume Thursday with 6.7 million shares changing hands. It is currently at four times its average daily volume and trading down 82 cents (-21.1%) at $3.07 as of 3:25 p.m. ET.

Corinthian Colleges has a market cap of $323.4 million and is part of the services sector and diversified services industry. Shares are up 79.3% year to date as of the close of trading on Wednesday.

Corinthian Colleges, Inc. operates as a post-secondary education company in the United States and Canada. It offers various diploma programs; and associate's, bachelor's; and master's degrees.

TheStreet Ratings rates Corinthian Colleges as a hold. The company's strengths can be seen in multiple areas, such as its compelling growth in net income, good cash flow from operations and impressive record of earnings per share growth. However, as a counter to these strengths, we find that the stock has had a generally disappointing performance in the past year. You can view the full Corinthian Colleges Ratings Report.

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