Coal Miner Peabody 1Q Earnings Slip

JIM SUHR

ST. LOUIS (AP) â¿¿ Peabody Energy Corp. said Thursday that its first-quarter profit slipped on weaker U.S. coal demand for electricity generation because of a mild winter and utility switchovers to cheaper natural gas.

But its January-March earnings still beat Wall Street's expectations and its shares rose about 7 percent.

Peabody, the world's biggest private-sector coal company, said its net income attributable to common shareholders was $172.7 million, or 63 cents per share, over the first three months of this year, down from $176.6 million, or 65 cents, a year earlier. Revenue rose 17 percent to $2.04 billion from $1.74 billion the same period a year ago.

On average, analysts polled by FactSet expected St. Louis-based Peabody to earn 55 cents per share on revenue of $2.08 billion.

The company also forecast adjusted diluted earnings in the second quarter at 40 to 65 cents per share, reflecting lower pricing for coal used in steelmaking and electricity generation.

Peabody's revenue increase was helped by its Australia operation, which is a key supplier of metallurgical coal for steelmaking in booming Asian markets. Revenue in that segment jumped 48 percent, while U.S. revenue was up 5 percent.

"Our operations contributed higher revenues and margins per ton in all regions, demonstrating the strength of our diverse platform in the face of challenging conditions," said Gregory Boyce, Peabody's chairman and chief executive.

Peabody and other coal companies face challenges from slowing growth in China, the world's second-biggest economy and a huge importer of coal. But Boyce said China's steel production rebounded last month and the country's coal imports are at a record level.

He insisted that global industry and economic data still suggest the industry is in what he has called a "coal supercycle," with China, India and other emerging Asian countries likely to account for more than 90 percent of the increase in global coal demand over the next quarter century. Many of those countries will look to Australia to fill the need, Boyce said.

If you liked this article you might like

U.S. Coal Exports Surge, Adding Fuel to Trump Energy Agenda's Fire

Coal Stocks Jump as Mining up 6% This Year

Is Trump Tampering With the Natural Progress of Civilization?

Paris Is Burning: Trump Tampers With Natural Progress of Civilization