For its fourth quarter ended in Dec. 31, Coinstar reported a profit of $31.5 million, or $1 per share, on revenue of $520.5 million. The average estimate of analysts polled by Thomson Reuters was for earnings of 64 cents a share on revenue of $498.1 million.

The company also forecast core earnings of 76 to 91 cents a share for its fiscal first quarter ending in March on revenue of between $530 million to $555 million vs. Wall Street's current consensus view for a profit of 86 cents a share on revenue of $514.5 million.

For fiscal 2012, Coinstar sees core earnings of $3.80 to $4.30 a share on revenue ranging from $2.075 billion to $2.250 billion vs. the average analysts' estimate for a profit of $3.86 a share on revenue of $2.17 billion.

In the NCR deal, Coinstar said it will be paying up to $100 million for the assets, and that it has also agreed to a manufacturing and services agreement with NCR.

The stock was last quoted at $59.02, up 16.7%, on volume of 2.4 million, according to Nasdaq.com. Based on Monday's regular-session close at $50.56, the shares had risen more than 20% over the past year.

"The strength of our core businesses provides a solid foundation that enables us to focus on key growth initiatives in 2012, including our joint venture with Verizon that was announced earlier today," said Paul Davis, the company's CEO, in a statement. "We are delighted to be partnering with Verizon to offer consumers affordable entertainment in both physical and streaming formats and look forward to launching our service in the second half of the year."

Coinstar said its Redbox DVD rental kiosk business delivered year-over-year revenue growth of nearly 40% in the latest quarter, totaling $445.6 million, because of "new kiosk installations, strong performance of new release titles, and consumer acceptance of the price increase," which went into effect in October.

NCR shares also got a lift from the news as well as its own above-consensus results, gaining 8.3% to $20.60 on volume of more than 85,000. The company reported a non-GAAP profit from continuing operations of 65 cents a share for the fourth quarter on revenue of $1.64 billion, beating Wall Street's view for earnings of 56 cents a share on revenue of $1.58 billion.

Other stocks active in late trades included PMC-Sierra ( PMCS), whose stock was down 6% to $6.33 on volume of more than 350,000 after the chip maker reported fourth-quarter revenue of $152.6 million, falling short of the analysts' average view of $155.3 million, and said "difficult conditions" are impacting its near-term outlook; Veeco Instruments ( VECO), whose shares dipped 4% to $26.01 on volume of more than 90,000 after the maker of LED and solar cell capital equipment forecast non-GAAP earnings of 13 to 34 cents a share for its fiscal first quarter vs. the current consensus estimate for earnings of 39 cents a share; and Standard Pacific ( SPF), whose stock leapt 7.4% to $4.35 on volume of more than 100,000 after the Irvine, Calif.-based home builder reported net income of $15.3 million, or 4 cents a share, for its fiscal fourth quarter, double Wall Street's expectations for earnings of 2 cents a share, and said it closed 2011 with a backlog of 681 homes, its highest year-end level since 2007.

-- Written by Michael Baron in New York.

>To contact the writer of this article, click here: Michael Baron.
Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors, reporters and analysts from holding positions in any individual stocks.

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