The Company calculates and reports FFO in accordance with the definition and interpretive guidelines issued by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT"), and consequently, FFO is defined as net income available to common stockholders, adjusted for the effects of asset dispositions and certain non-cash items, primarily depreciation and amortization. The Company believes that FFO is an important supplemental measure of its operating performance. Because the historical cost accounting convention used for real estate assets requires depreciation (except on land), such accounting presentation implies that the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably over time, while real estate values instead have historically risen or fallen with market conditions. The term FFO was designed by the real estate industry to address this issue. FFO described herein is not necessarily comparable to FFO of other real estate investment trusts, or REITs, that do not use the same definition or implementation guidelines or interpret the standards differently from the Company.

The Company uses FFO as one of several criteria to measure the operating performance of its business. The Company further believes that by excluding the effect of depreciation, amortization and gains or losses from sales of real estate, all of which are based on historical costs and which may be of limited relevance in evaluating current performance, FFO can facilitate comparisons of operating performance between periods and between other REITs. The Company offers this measure to assist the users of its financial statements in analyzing its performance; however, this is not a measure of financial performance under GAAP and should not be considered a measure of liquidity, an alternative to net income or an indicator of any other performance measure determined in accordance with GAAP. Investors and potential investors in the Company’s securities should not rely on this measure as a substitute for any GAAP measure, including net income.

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