Former United States Securities and Exchange Commission attorney Willie Briscoe, founder of The Briscoe Law Firm, PLLC, and the securities litigation firm of Powers Taylor, LLP announce that the firms are investigating legal claims against the officers and Board of Directors of Juniper Networks, Inc. (“Juniper Networks” or “JNPR”) (NYSE: JNPR) related to potentially misleading statements issued by Juniper Networks between July 20, 2010 and July 26, 2011 (the “Class Period”).

If you are an affected investor and you want to learn more about the lawsuit or join the action, contact Patrick Powers at Powers Taylor, LLP, toll free (877) 728-9607, via e-mail at patrick@powerstaylor.com, or Willie Briscoe at The Briscoe Law Firm, PLLC, (214) 706-9314, or via email at WBriscoe@TheBriscoeLawFirm.com. There is no cost or fee to you.

It has been alleged that during the Class Period, Juniper Networks and certain of its officers and directors made materially false and misleading statements or failed to disclose material information related to the company’s business and operations in violation of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Specifically, it is claimed that Juniper Networks and the other defendants misrepresented and/or failed to disclose the following adverse facts: (a) due to technical issues with certain of its products and turnover in its sales force, Juniper Networks was losing market share in its security business to its competitors; (b) in order to maintain market share and meet its previously announced growth rate targets in the face of the intense pricing pressure being exerted by the company’s competitors in both the switching and routing markets, Juniper Networks was forced to dramatically lower prices, which was having a material adverse effect on the company’s margins; (c) Juniper Network’s new product launches would not meaningfully contribute to the company’s operations until 2012; and (d) based on the foregoing, defendants lacked a reasonable basis for their positive statements about Juniper Network’s growth rates, market share, orders, new product introductions, gross and operating margins, and the company’s ability to deliver upon its long-term growth model. As a result of these alleged false and misleading statements, Juniper's stock traded at artificially inflated prices during the class period.

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