Comrie's proposal had stricter health guidelines than San Francisco's. In doing so, he declared that "it's important to find a way to make a healthy lifestyle palatable and exciting."

Restaurants caught violating the ban, if it were passed in New York City, would face fines ranging between $200 and $2,500.

Comrie, a Democrat from Queens and self-described busy parent, says his motivation stems from personal guilt about his unhealthy eating habits and the fact that he has purchased many a Happy Meal for his own kids.

Comrie is overweight himself, and hopes the Fast Food Toy Ban Bill will pass, as it did in San Francisco.

"I am an example," he said. "If you look at me. I enjoy fast food and unhealthy eating."

McDonald's and the New York State Restaurant Association are likely not to take this battle lightly.

"This proposal robs parents of choice while increasing the already burdensome regulation on local restaurant owners," said Andrew Rigie, executive vice president of the New York City Chapter of the New York Restaurant Association, according to a New York Times report.

An executive for McDonald's New York region, Mason Smott, said that "taking away toys from kids' meals won't solve childhood obesity."

"Our Happy Meals make it easier for families to choose the right foods in portions just for kids," Smoot said. "We provide options for our customers and trust them to make the decisions that are right for their families. Politicians should, too."

If you liked this article you might like

Crazy Weak U.S. Dollar Will Make These 10 Companies Huge Winners

How to Travel in Style Exactly Like Billionaire Warren Buffett

Panera Bread Dares CEOs of McDonald's, Wendy's and Others to Eat Off Kids Menu

How Healthy Is That Happy Meal? Inside the Kids' Menus at McDonald's and More

Stocks Dad Would Have Loved, And Why He Was Right