'Fast Money' Recap: Netflix Doubts

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- The markets moved higher Wednesday as the Fed left interest rates alone.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 8.25, or 0.07%, to 11,985.44. The S&P 500 rose 5.45, or 0.42%, to 1,296.63. The Nasdaq rose 20.25, or 0.74%, to 2,739.63.

Pete Najarian said on CNBC's "Fast Money" TV show, that Netflix ( NFLX) was moving higher on blow-out numbers in its earnings report, including a subscriber base that topped 20 million. He was impressed with the company's operating margin of 13% and its ability to raise DVD rentals.

For a breakout of some stocks from a recent "Fast Money" TV show, check out Dan Fitzpatrick's "3 Stocks I Saw on TV."

3 Stocks I Saw on TV

Guy Adami said the market gave the stock the pass, despite a disappointing gross margin and a churn of 3.8%. He said a lot of investors who were shorting the stock into earnings were feeling a lot of pain. He also said the stock would have to move above $209.24 to move higher.

Karen Finerman considered the 25% short interest dangerous. "I don't know what you would do if you are short."

Brian Kelly said Netflix were offering a lot of more free trials but not doing a good job of converting them into subscriptions.

Melissa Lee, the moderator of the show, said it was disconcerting to see there was little in the way of guidance except for a reference to domestic operating margins of 14%.

Adami said naysayers and shorts will take that lack of guidance and lean into the stock Thursday. However, he said it's hard to short the stock.

Joshua Brown said the options market was pricing in a 10 percent move in either direction. He said no one is getting squeezed just yet.

Michael Pachter, an analyst with Wedbush Securities, mentioned three reasons why he is down on the stock. He said the company needs to grow its revenue faster to justify being a $200 stock. He said the lack of annual guidance was a "giant smoking gun" for investors about its ability to grow. And he said the company faces higher content costs.

Qualcomm ( QCOM) was up 6% in afterhours trading after a strong earnings report and guidance. Adami said Qualcomm had a "fantastic" quarter and saw no reason why it couldn't move higher.

Najarian said Qualcomm has made all the right moves in the tablet market, raised full-year guidance by $1 billion over Street estimates and is positioned well to take advantage of the shift toward mass-market smartphones.

Kelly said he was looking out for companies with high inventories and high margins. He said MEMC Electronic Materials ( MEMC) and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters ( GMCR) fit that bill. He said those companies won't see high margins in the future if their inventories continue to rise.

Lee noted that a day after Obama's pro-America State of the Union Address, steel stocks were the rise, including AK Steel Holding ( AKS) and U.S. Steel ( X). "It's a good sign for the economy," Adami said.

He said everything America seem to work today after the State of the Union address. Najarian said that was certainly evident in the copper and coal industries.

Kelly said Titanium Metals ( TIE) was doing well in the aftermarket parts market in the commercial aerospace sector. He said Boeing ( BA)'s backlog remains the same, despite its problems, adding it has not cut the suppliers.

Andrew Busch, of BMO Capital Markets, said Obama missed the ball in his speech. He said the president should have focused on tax reform at the individual and corporate levels instead of talking about spending money on infrastructure. He said the market will let it go for now but will soon figure out it's not going to happen.

Looking ahead to Amazon.com ( AMZN), which posts its earnings Thursday, Colin Gillis, of BGC Financial, expressed his concerns about the stock.

Gillis said Amazon's revenue growth is not scaling into operating income growth. He said the market cap has gotten too large and its competitive position to deliver digital goods is mediocre.

Lee said Starbucks ( SBUX) was trading lower as it is feeling the impact of higher commodity costs. That prompted Kelly to wonder just how long sugar is going to be free at Starbucks.

Adami, though, said the drop in Starbucks was just a pullback in a longer bull run. He liked the company's operating margins and comparable store sales.

Lee brought in Corning ( GLW) CEO Wendell Weeks, who was in the House chambers when Obama delivered his address.

Weeks said the administration should work to make the tax code simpler and straightforward. He said the tax reforms will encourage job growth, help companies compete and help the country move into the next generation of innovation.

Which countries are doing a better job of competing than the U.S.? David Reidel, president of Reidel Research Group, said China is "eating our lunch" in manufacturing, while India is beating the U.S. in IT outsourcing and call center operations.

He mentioned two companies that stood out: a company in China called New Oriental Educational Education that specializes in English language training as well as afterschool and adult education. The other was in India: Tata Motors ( TTM), which is doing a good job producing a product lineup for emerging markets.

In the Tweet the Street segment, Finerman said a caller expressed concerns about the steep yield curve and bank stocks. She said she likes the bank stocks, especially Bank of America ( BAC), which she believes can earn its way out of its problems.

In the final trades, Brown liked Cameco ( CCJ). Kelly liked Freeport McMoRan ( FCX). Adami went with Cooper ( CBE). Finerman liked Bank of America and Najarian liked Teck Resources ( TCKGM).

--Written by David Tong in San Francisco.

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