NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Howard Stern told Piers Morgan that he considered retiring last year, but that his "neurotic compulsion" drove him to continue.

In an interview with Piers Morgan on CNN on Tuesday night, Stern said he thought about ending his famous morning radio program, The Howard Stern Show.

"Really, why am I doing this anymore?" Stern said he thought to himself a few months ago. "It makes me crazy. I hate getting up early in the morning and I don't particularly like doing the show."

Stern told Morgan that he is "driven by a neurotic compulsion" to continue doing his show.

"I think it's my identity," Stern said of his on-air radio personality. "This is who I am. This is what I do."

The self-proclaimed "King of All Media" has two channels in his name on Sirius XM ( SIRI) -- Howard 100 and Howard 101.

The shock jock signed a new 5-year contract with Sirius at the end of last year, ending months of speculation regarding his plans.

His announcement came less than a month before his original 5-year, $500 million deal with the satellite radio company was due to expire.

The news may not have come as a surprise after the majority of TheStreet readers who took our poll said they thought Stern was going to stay on at Sirius.

Of the 9,780 voters, 51.8% expected Stern to sign a contract with Sirius for two years or less, while 32.2% said he would sign a contract for 3 years or more. Only 16% of voters believed Stern would not re-sign with Sirius.

Sirius is scheduled to release its fourth-quarter earnings report on Feb. 24. By the end of Nov., 2010, Sirius had passed the 20 million subscriber mark, and reached the highest number of net subscribers in satellite radio history.

Sirius CEO Mel Karmazin says the company will report a total of 20.1 million subscribers for 2010.

Today Sirius shares are down about 1.9% to around $1.55.

--Written by Theresa McCabe in Boston.

>To contact the writer of this article, click here: Theresa McCabe.

>To follow the writer on Twitter, go to @TheresaMcCabe.

>To submit a news tip, send an email to: tips@thestreet.com.

RELATED STORIES:


Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors and reporters from holding positions in any individual stocks.