Televisions
Televisions are a considerable investment, but one the National Retail Federation says 3.6% of all Super Bowl-watching Americans made last year. NPD Group found flat-screen televisions grew from 43% of the market during Super Bowl week in 2006 to 94% in 2008, with popular LCD models growing to 79% from 23% in the same span. Since then, according to NPD and market research company DisplaySearch, average TV prices fell 22% in 2009 and another 6% last year. Yet TV shipments remained, well, flat for much of last year as unemployment led to only 0.4% growth in the first three quarters of this year compared with 2009.

This means that even after a slew of holiday sales, which NPD says increased TV sales 5% but decreased revenue by 2%, retailers such as Wal-Mart ( WMT) and Amazon ( AMZN) will be touting TV deals just in time for kickoff. Wal-Mart is already holding a "Game Time" sale featuring $600 Sharp 42-inch HDTVs, $750 Element 55-inch models ($800 with a home theater bundle) and a $480 Sharp HDTV with a home theater system.

-- Written by Jason Notte in Boston.

>To contact the writer of this article, click here: Jason Notte.

>To follow the writer on Twitter, go to http://twitter.com/notteham.

>To submit a news tip, send an email to: tips@thestreet.com.

RELATED STORIES:



Follow TheStreet.com on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.
Jason Notte is a reporter for TheStreet.com. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Esquire.com, Time Out New York, the Boston Herald, The Boston Phoenix, Metro newspaper and the Colorado Springs Independent.

If you liked this article you might like

Buffalo Wild Wings Sees Exploding Chicken Wing Prices Just in Time for Football

Eating McDonald's Stock Might Make You Sick

Investors in Restaurant Stocks Still Need Strong Stomachs

Papa John's and Domino's Are Being Surprisingly Attacked by These New Foes