NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- The sports blogosphere was abuzz with accusations Tuesday that Brent Musburger and ESPN cashed in for Tostitos chips before the game-winning field goal on the last play of the Tostitos BCS National Championship Game between Auburn and Oregon.

Musburger, calling the game Monday night for ESPN, which is owned by Disney ( DIS), said before the 19-yard-field goal by Auburn kicker Wes Byrum that gave No. 1 Auburn a 22-19 victory: "This is for all the Tostitos."

I had used the phrase in a headline Friday on my preview of the Auburn-Oregon game and was all self-satisfied that I may have been part of a viral Web wave.

Darren Rovell, CNBC sports business writer, had Tweeted that the product mention was worth $2.5 million. He then dutifully followed up with a Tweet from a spokesperson for Tostitos maker Frito-Lay, a unit of Pepsico ( PEP), saying that the company did not pay for the one-liner. ESPN said it had nothing to do with it either.

It also turns out, (thanks to deadpsin.com) that Musburger had used that same line in 2002 (see video below, at 1:03), when Ohio State beat Michigan and would go on to play in the, why of course, Tostitos Fiesta Bowl national championship game against Miami.

So all I really had was a stale bag of chips. Only I don't remember it sparking the same uproar at the time. Back then, the college football Web world hadn't yet gone to 24-7 mode like it is in now. Nor was there the agglomeration of recruiting and fan Web sites for this beloved sport. There also wasn't a vociferous and growing network of critics of the BCS' every move.

The moral of the story is that college football has many guardians who are ready to pounce, and it's all rolled up nicely in a smorgasbord of American capitalism. Hopefully, someday we'll get a comprehensive, on-the-field playoff system that so many clamor for. But for now, pass the dip.

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