Search Jim Cramer's Mad Money trading recommendations using our exclusive Mad Money Stock Screener and watch Jim Cramer's Mad Money Post Game video exclusively on TheStreet.com.


NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- "Don't repeat the mistakes of 2010 in 2011," Jim Cramer cautioned the viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Friday. He told investors when they hear negative news, "stay the course."

Cramer said his strategy for the market is to sell into the pops and buy into the dips. He told viewers to not let negative news about a single company or sector cloud their judgement when it comes to the market as a whole. Cramer said growth matters, rising sales matter and bigger dividends matter. What doesn't matter, he said, is the onslaught of negative daily chatter.

That's why for next week's trading, Cramer will be looking at Alcoa ( AA), a stock which he owns for his charitable trust, Action Alerts PLUS . Cramer reiterated his $22 price target on the metals maker and told viewers to watch for the company's cash flow and the strength of its balance sheet.

On Tuesday, Cramer told viewers to take a pass on grocer SuperValu ( SVU) and home building Lennar ( LEN), both of which he expects to disappoint.

On Wednesday, Cramer said he will be listening to wireless networking play Dragonwave ( DRWI). He told viewers to listen and learn. Then on Thursday, Cramer told viewers he expects the naysayers in Action Alerts PLUS name Intel ( INTC) to be proven wrong, as that company outlines its mobile strategy and its strength in servers and security.

Finally on Friday, Cramer said the stock to watch is another Action Alerts PLUS name, JPMorgan Chase ( JPM). Cramer said he's hoping for continued strength, and a possible dividend boost, from one of his favorite bank stocks.

Still Growing

In the "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Robert Gross, chairman and CEO of Monro Muffler Brake ( MNRO), a stock that's up 135% since Cramer recommended in August of 2008, but also one that's been hammered down four points in the past two weeks on fears that increased new car sales will hurt the repair chain that focuses on older cars.

Gross said the market is selling Monro's stock based on a 13 million new car sales estimate for 2011, which is greatly improved over last year. But, he noted, for seven of the past 10 years, new car sales were over 16 million a year and during those years Monro grew by 20% a year.

Gross said Monro is still a growth company and only has 783 stores in 19 states. He estimated his company could grow three times bigger and not leave its current footprint.

When asked about buying back shares at this depressed level, Gross said Monroe has been very shareholder friendly, raising its dividend five times over the past five years as well as splitting its stock a few times. He said at the current time, Monro feels the best way to increase shareholder value is to continue making acquisitions, adding market share and growing the company.

Cramer said he's banking with Gross and is sticking by his recommendation of Monro.

Truck Rally

Investors looking to speculate in the red hot truck bull market should look no further than Accuride ( ACW), a little known parts maker that just emerged from bankruptcy.

Cramer said Accuride is to trucks what Lear ( LEA) was to cars, likening Accuride to Lear's 66% gain after it emerged from bankruptcy last year.

Cramer said all signs point to a continued rally in new trucks, with December seeing big truck sales up 115% year over year and trailer production also ramping higher.

Yet Accuride shares have been doing very little since rising from bulletin board trading back to the New York Stock Exchange just three weeks ago. Cramer said Accuride has only two analysts covering the company and the stock has been trading flat.

Cramer said Accuride, which makes wheels, chassis parts and seating assemblies for big trucks, is trading at just 14.5 times 2011 earnings, while rivals like Wabco ( WAB), an Action Alerts PLUS name, trades at 16 times earnings.

With truck engine maker Cummins ( CMI) up 202% since Cramer first acknowledged the return of trucking in America two years ago, Cramer said the time is now to seize onto Accuride.

Mad Mail

Cramer followed up on Trimas ( TRS), a stock that stumped him earlier this week. Cramer said this diversified industrial company is spread pretty thin, making it hard to understand. He recommended Eaton ( ETN) and Honeywell ( HON) as better plays, each with a 2% dividend yield.

When asked if he should sell Agnico-Eagle Mines ( AEM), Cramer said "you don't sell the best run gold miner." Cramer also suggested holding onto First Niagara Financial ( FNFG) on the heels of consolidation in the regional banking group.

Cramer told another viewer that while Wendy's ( WEN) is cheap compared to McDonald's ( MCD) he's always willing to pay up for the best-of-breed company in a given sector.

Finally, when asked about mergers and acquisitions facilitator Lazard ( LAZ), Cramer said he'd be a buyer of Goldman Sachs ( GS), a company that he called "back and bigger than ever."

Lightning Round

Cramer was bullish on Freeport-McMoRan ( FCX), Macy's ( M), Entropic Communications ( ENTR), Jabil Circuit ( JBL) and Johnson Controls ( JCI).

He was bearish on Alcatel Lucent ( ALU) and SandRidge Energy ( SD).

Closing Comments

In his "No Huddle Offense" segment, Cramer said he may have been too negative on Dean Foods ( DF) and Diamond Offshore ( DO) earlier this week after Dean received an investment from Appaloosa Management and Diamond Offshore received an upgrade from Goldman Sachs.

Cramer said he would still swap out of Diamond in favor of Weatherford ( WFT), and Action Alerts PLUS stock, and he's still not sure about Dean Foods, but it is possible that he was just too negative on the outlook for both companies.

--Written by Scott Rutt in Washington, D.C.

To contact the writer of this article, click here: Scott Rutt.

To follow the writer on Twitter, go to http://twitter.com/scottrutt.

To submit a news tip, send an email to: tips@thestreet.com.

To watch replays of Cramer's video segments, visit the Mad Money page on CNBC.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by clicking here.

For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round, click here .
At the time of publication, Cramer was long Aloca, JPMorgan, Intel and Weatherford .

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, TheStreet.com or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor TheStreet.com, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on TheStreet.com. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.