Kansas City Gas Prices Jump

By Kansas City Business Journal

The average price of a gallon of gasoline in Kansas City has jumped 6.9 cents a gallon during the past week, according to KCGasPrices.com.

The gasoline price website, operated by GasBuddy, reported that the average price of a gallon of gasoline reached $2.90 on Sunday.

Thatâ¿¿s still lower than the $3.05 national average, but the U.S. average rose only 1.4 cents a gallon during the past week.

Experts predict that gas prices in parts of the United States could reach $4 a gallon by summer, according to an Associated Press report.

Kansas City gas prices on Sunday were 38.1 cents a gallon higher than a year prior and 17.6 cents a gallon more than their mark a month prior.

By comparison, the national average price for a gallon of fuel is up 39.6 cents from a year prior and 12.8 cents from a month prior.

According to AAAâ¿¿s Daily Fuel Gauge Report, fuel prices on Monday on the Missouri side of the Kansas City metro area are at $2.875 a gallon. A week ago, they were at $2.814, and a year ago, they were at $2.502.

On the Kansas side of the metro area, Monday prices were at $2.964 a gallon, compared with $2.904 a week ago and $2.587 a year ago.

Copyright 2011 American City Business Journals

http://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity/news/2011/01/03/kansas-city-gas-prices-jump.html?ana=thestreet

Copyright bizjournals.com 2010

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