U.S. Mint, Propoxyphene: Hot Trends

(Information on the new collectible coins and propoxyphene updated in today's Hot Trends article)

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- "U.S. mint" is a trending search topic after the collector's version of the 2010 proof silver eagle coin went on sale today. The U.S. mint price for the coin is $45.95, plus a shipping and handling charge of $4.95 per order.

The new "America the Beautiful" quarter coin set came out today as well, while the uncirculated coin set will be released on Nov. 23.

On Thursday, the new collectible presidential $1 coins became available for purchase. The new $1 coins feature a portrait of President Abraham Lincoln and are priced at $35.95 per roll of 25.


"Propoxyphene" is a heavily searched word today following news that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requested that the medication be withdrawn the from the U.S. market.

As a result, Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals has taken Darvon and Darvocet off the market. Darvon and Darvocet are the brand versions of the prescription pain medication propoxyphene.

The FDA also requested that generic manufacturers remove any products containing the medication from the market as well.


"Android" is a heavily searched topic today after Google's ( GOOG) Android operating system and Apple's ( AAPL) iOS each accounted for 37% of traffic on Millennial Media's network in the U.S. in October.

This is up from September when iOS made up 46% of traffic and Android accounted for 29%.

The two major systems were trailed by Research in Motion ( RIMM) with 20%. Nokia's ( NOK) Symbian and Microsoft ( MSFT) tied with 2%, while "other" accounted for the remaining 2%.

Apple remains the No. 1 device manufacturer in Millennial Media's advertising network with a 25% share.


"Bankruptcy" is a popular search topic today after a study showed that the number of Americans aged 65 and older declaring bankruptcy is on the rise.

The study conducted by John Pottow, a law professor at the University of Michigan Law School, showed that by 2007, 7% of those filing for bankruptcy were 65 or older, up from 4% in 2001.

Professor Pottow said that more than 66% of those 65 and older who filed for bankruptcy blamed credit cards for their financial problems. "They're using credit cards as a maladaptive coping mechanism," Pottow said.

The research also showed that about 40% of adults were still struggling with medical bills after they filed for bankruptcy.

The chatter on Main Street (a.k.a. Google) is always of interest to investors on Wall Street. Thus, each day, TheStreet compiles the stories that are trending on Google, and highlights the news that could make stocks move.

-- Written by Theresa McCabe in Boston.

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Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors and reporters from holding positions in any individual stocks.

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