NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Gold prices were consolidating their gains Friday as China took more steps to stem inflation.

Gold for December delivery settled down 70 cents at $1,352.30 an ounce at the Comex division of the New York Mercantile Exchange. Prices lost 1.4% of their value this week. The gold price Friday traded as high as $1,362.90 and as low as $1,341.

The U.S. dollar index was down 0.12% at $78.48 while the euro rose 0.21% to $1.36 vs. the dollar. The spot gold price was losing 70 cents, according to Kitco's gold index.

Gold prices flat-lined Friday as China's central bank raised the amount of money banks must hold in their reserves by another 50 basis points. This is the second move in two weeks and the fifth this year. By raising the reserve ratio, China is hoping to take more money out of circulation to keep a lid on inflation, which popped in October to 4.4% from a year earlier.

Traders had been expecting some kind of move, although the rumor was a hike in interest rates, which the country typically does around the 20th of any given month. Raising the reserve ratio is not as aggressive as raising key interest rates, but is enough to cap gold's 1.2% rally on Thursday.

"Every bit of news suddenly takes on a greater level of importance when people are at this level of nervousness," says Jon Nadler, senior analyst at Kitco.com. The more China takes steps to manage inflation, the more the investors buying gold as a hedge against inflation might dump their gold positions. Less cash in circulation and higher borrowing costs also cut into people's ability to spend.

China is quickly catching up to India as the largest gold consumer in the world. In the third quarter, jewelry demand rose 8% and demand for gold bars and coins surged 64% from year earlier levels, according to a report by the World Gold Council. Any decrease in demand from the country would hurt a key growth factor for the gold market.

Adrian Ash, head of research for bullionvault.com, says panic is unfounded and that central banks would have "to raise interest rates by a long way before it really makes a difference for cash savers."

If you liked this article you might like

Market Recon: It's Obvious the U.S. Consumer Is Far From Being OK

Week Ahead: Apple Earnings, Jobs Report on the Docket in Busy Start to May

These Four Gold Miners Are Ready to Break Higher

Gold Rush: These Four Gold Miners Are Ready to Break Higher

Gold and Gold Stocks Lost Their Luster Since Post-Election Highs