By Business First of Columbus

Battelle has been awarded more than $400,000 in federal stimulus funding for a new energy research project that could drastically boost the energy efficiency of air conditioning technology.

The U.S. Department of Energy this week awarded $92 million in funding from the $787 billion federal stimulus package to 43 green technology projects nationwide. A trio of Ohio organizations, including Battelle, took in a piece of $5.9 million in funding earmarked for the state.

Battelleâ¿¿s project, which received $401,654, uses a new osmosis process to separate water from salt, a contrast from traditional cooling methods that use compressors. The end result, the Energy Department said, could be a 50 percent boost in the energy efficiency of air conditioning.

The Columbus research and development giantâ¿¿s project is one of two in Ohio tied to cooling technology. ADMA of Hudson was awarded $3.27 million for a project aimed at separating water molecules from air using new technology. The other Ohio award in the latest round went to Case Western Reserve University, which received $2.25 million for a development project for capacitors used in the hybrid vehicle and consumer electronics markets.

Copyright 2010 American City Business Journals

http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2010/07/12/daily9.html?ana=thestreet

Copyright bizjournals.com 2010

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