BOSTON (TheStreet) --Summer's here.

Which means it's time to admit to yourself that most of your New Year's resolutions went by the wayside sometime around Groundhog Day. Here's a look at some of the most popular resolutions that Americans haven't kept -- financial and otherwise -- and the money they're wasting.

We resolved to work out more

Thanks in large part to suckers who joined a gym in January, the fitness-club industry garnered revenue of $24 billion in 2009, and it's expected to keep growing over the next five years, according to market-research firm IBISWorld. Some 45.5 million Americans belong to a health club, according to the International Health, Racquet and Sports Club Association.

But the association also reports that members go to their gyms only 101 days a year. Factor in the gym nuts who work out twice a day and you're left with a whole lot of people who join a gym and never go. If you've pretty much quit working out, consider benching the membership. While many gyms charge hefty fees for canceling the membership entirely, some allow members to put their memberships on hold temporarily, especially in the event of an illness or job loss.

We resolved to lose weight

It would seem logical that eating less food would result in spending less money. Yet the weight-loss services industry booked revenue of $3.9 billion in 2009, led by the likes of Weight Watchers International ( WTW) (with 18.7% of the market) and NutriSystem ( NTRI) (14.6%), according to IBISWorld.

Meanwhile, two-thirds of Americans are overweight and nearly a third are obese, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Don't give up the fight. But if your monthly fee for an online weight-loss service hasn't yielded results in the past six months, maybe it's time to consider that eating a branded frozen dinner, while logging calories on a computer, might not be as effective as taking a long walk with a carrot.

We resolved to quit smoking

By now, we know that the surgeon general has determined that smoking is bad for your health, but the tobacco industry still produces revenue in excess of $1.5 billion, according to IBISWorld.

Philip Morris' ( PM) Marlboro remains the market leader, with sales greater than its five leading competitors combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

If you tried -- and failed -- to quit smoking in the first half of 2010, you may want to try again in the second half, especially if you're a New Yorker. First, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, signed into law a year ago, finally went into effect last week. Cigarette companies are now required to cover half of the front and rear of each pack with warning labels, making the health risks harder to ignore.

Second, the New York legislature just passed a law that adds $1.60 in state taxes to every pack of cigarettes. The law, which goes into effect July 1, will push the average price of a pack to $9.20 -- and close to $11 a pack in New York City, which adds its own tax, according to the New York Times. For two-pack-a-day Manhattan dwellers, that adds up to $8,030 a year for cigarettes. Do the math, keep that resolution and get out of debt.

We resolved to get out of debt

American consumers are often pretty good about paying down credit-card debt in the first quarter of the year. Having splurged on the holidays, they're ultra-conscious of expenditures. They may have year-end bonuses at their disposal. And their incomes are bolstered by annual tax refunds.

"Unfortunately, people start collecting debt again in the second, third and fourth quarters," says Odysseas Papadimitriou, chief executive officer of credit-card information company Cardhub.com, which recently issued a study showing that American consumers are likely to end up in deeper debt at the end of 2010 than they were at the end of 2009. Turns out, they paid down 23% less debt in the first quarter of 2010 than they did in the first quarter of 2009.

Papadimitriou suggests that those reassessing their finances at mid-year consider a balance transfer to a credit card with a lower interest rate. Still, all the balance transfers in the world won't cure the spending habits of those who don't know the difference between a luxury and a necessity.

"It's like a diet," Papadimitriou says. "It takes just one chocolate to undo a long run."

-- Reported by Carmen Nobel in Boston.

Readers Also Like:

Follow TheStreet.com on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

More from Savings

What the Fed Rate Hike Means For You

What the Fed Rate Hike Means For You

To Easily Get Out of Credit Card Fees and Charges - Just Ask the Right Question

To Easily Get Out of Credit Card Fees and Charges - Just Ask the Right Question

How Technology Is Disrupting Retirement Planning

How Technology Is Disrupting Retirement Planning

How to Calculate Your Net Worth and Pin Down Your Financial Health

How to Calculate Your Net Worth and Pin Down Your Financial Health

Social Security: What You Don't Know About Your Biggest Retirement Benefit

Social Security: What You Don't Know About Your Biggest Retirement Benefit