BOCA RATON, FL (TheStreet) -- The battle between Google (GOOG) and the Chinese government appears to be over. Google broke down its small campground and retreated to Hong Kong.

And to victory.

Does anyone honestly believe that Google will not be in China someday in some way? We're talking about the Death Star here folks. We thought it blew up, but it really didn't. The Emperor was just biding his time.

The decision by Google to not conform to Chinese censorship laws is based on principle, something rarely seen in the business world these days. At least that's what they're telling us. But we know one of their guiding precepts is "Don't be evil" and in part states: "...it's about providing our users unbiased access to information, focusing on their needs and giving them the best products and services that we can. But it's also about doing the right thing more generally -- following the law, acting honorably and treating each other with respect."

Good stuff. The Chinese government's fetish with controlling its people clearly runs counter to this concept, but you can only keep people in the dark for so long, especially with emerging technologies bringing down borders. The Green Revolution in Iran caught fire as a result of the "elections" and resulting brutal crackdown by the government (which apparently didn't violate our administrations Code of Conduct since we sat that one out). Technology, such as Twitter, brought unfiltered information from the front lines.

Google is taking a short-term hit to its stock, while the obvious beneficiary Baidu ( BIDU) has rallied. But let's break this down a little more than the action this week.

Anyone who wants to do business in China has to conform to their censorship rules, so it's not like Yahoo! search, or Microsoft's Bing will be grabbing market share there, unless they want to look like puppets of the state. Not the best marketing strategy.

On a side note, Bing has a name problem, and not just here in the U.S. In Chinese, "Bing" means being sick or having a cold, depending on the pronunciation. It could also mean pancake. They could obviously change the name, but bending over backward to grab market share in a communist country is just bad PR. I can already see the Google campaign: "Microsoft's new motto: Do Evil".

While the Chinese government may have won this battle, I'm convinced that Google will ultimately win the war. I'm bullish on Google and personally hold options positions that reflect this opinion.

Firing line: Businesses that stand on principle win out in the long run. Sacrificing your core values for a buck may work in the short run, but ultimately, it is a losing strategy.

At the time of publications, Buckley was long GOOG options.

Matthew "Whiz" Buckley is the chief strategy officer of Options University, a provider of options education for options traders of all levels. . He is also the founder of Strike Fighter Financial, a business-consulting firm specializing in leadership development, risk management and strategic planning for Fortune 500 companies and related organizations. Buckley flew the F-18 Hornet for the U.S. Navy. He's a graduate of TOPGUN, has close to 400 carrier landings and flew 44 combat sorties over Iraq. After leaving active duty, he worked as managing director of strategy at a Wall Street firm and CEO of a financial media company. He is an internationally recognized speaker and combined his experiences in the military and corporate America in his book "From Sea Level to C Level."

More from Opinion

Red Hat CFO Tells TheStreet: Tech Trends Are Still in Our Favor

Red Hat CFO Tells TheStreet: Tech Trends Are Still in Our Favor

Throwback Thursday: Intel Edition

Throwback Thursday: Intel Edition

Intel's Next CEO Should Try Harder to Protect Its Flanks Against AMD and Others

Intel's Next CEO Should Try Harder to Protect Its Flanks Against AMD and Others

3 Warren Buffett Stock Picks That Could Be Perfect for Your Retirement Portfolio

3 Warren Buffett Stock Picks That Could Be Perfect for Your Retirement Portfolio

Wednesday Wrap-Up: GE and Facebook

Wednesday Wrap-Up: GE and Facebook