OMAHA, Neb. ( TheStreet) -- Warren Buffett has been on CNBC in the past few months about as often as the yourmarketingsucks.com guy and Olympic curling.

First, Buffett played the business world equivalent of Charlie Rose, moderating a video interview with former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson. Then Buffett provided CNBC with his thoughts on Kraft's ( KFT) planned acquisition of Cadbury ( CBY) and President Obama's proposed bank tax -- both which received harsh words from the Oracle of Omaha.

And then came Monday, and another CNBC appearance for the television personality formerly known as Warren Buffett. The Berkshire Hathaway ( BRK.B) chief -- who noted in this year's annual letter how he loves his job so much he virtually tap dances into work -- was doing the CNBC shuffle after the weekend release of Berkshire Hathaway's 2009 earnings and Buffett's annual epistolary to shareholders.

Of course, the market doesn't only mine the Berkshire Hathaway annual report for gems of financial wisdom, but for the usual quotable quotes from Warren, and there is no doubt that between his television savvy and well-penned wit, Buffett could supply the Late Show with David Letterman with Top 10 list materials ad infinitum -- if only being a television writer paid as much as his current employment.

In fact, it seems hard to resist the conclusion that Buffett derives almost as much pleasure from his annual witticisms as he does from analysis of book value, insurance premiums and bridge-table stratagems.

In this listing spirit, TheStreet has mined Buffett's latest annual letter for the most potent quotable material -- Buffett's best stand-up comedy material from the 2009 year-ender, should he ever have to fall back on a career in entertainment.

Mind you, TheStreet is not in the business of ranking the wittiest things said or written by corporate executives. Thus, we're leaving it up to the readers of TheStreet to pick the "No. 1 Most Witty Remark Made by Warren Buffett in the 2009 Annual Letter to Shareholders."

The comment most noted by the press from the 2009 Berkshire Hathaway chairman's letter has been Buffett's send-off to shareholders.

Financial reporters have devoted needless hours of writing time to hauling one more railroad-inspired joke from the freight car's worth of humor laid down since the Burlington Northern acquisition was announced in November. It took Buffett no more than three words to offer his entry in the annals of Buffett railroad one-liners. Expressing his desire to see as many shareholders as possible at the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting in May, Buffett signed off by writing, "P.S. Come by rail."

Of course, while these three words captured Buffett's sly humor, there were several more extended and imaginative riffs in the annual letter, ranging from comments on the housing market to a slap in the collective face of Wall Street heavyweights, and offbeat comparisons between business problem-solving and country music.

As Buffett refers to the annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway shareholders as "Woodstock for Capitalists" you sometimes have to wonder if he gets "a little help from his friends" in coming up with this stuff.

Take this bit of Buffett wisdom inspired by Jacobi, the great Prussian mathematician. Jacobi counseled "Invert, always invert" as an aid to solving difficult problems.

Buffett turned Jacobi's advice on its head, or at least shifted the wisdom in the direction of middle America, appealing to the Carrie Underwood-listening, NASCAR-watching faithful among the Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. Buffett summed up Jacobi's law by writing: "I can report as well that this inversion approachworks on a less lofty level: Sing a country song in reverse, and you will quickly recover your car, house and wife."

Buffett also exhibited some tough love -- actually, love is too kind a word -- for Wall Street executives, and he turned to a literary amalgam of Tennessee Williams and Ben Bernanke to beat up on the bailed out banks and their executives.

Among a litany of harsh remarks aimed at the same 'business as usual' on Wall Street that President Obama has also derided, Buffett reminded investors that Berkshire Hathaway stood the test of the financial crisis better than just about any company, writing: "We will never become dependent on the kindness of strangers. Too-big-to-fail is not a fallback position at Berkshire."

Of course, Berkshire Hathaway could not avoid the crisis in the housing market, but Buffett sees a comeback by year-end 2010 for its U.S. housing operating subsidiary, Clayton Homes. What's more, in his discussion of a housing comeback, Buffett provided some of his most imaginative economic thinking.

Writing about the oversupply in the U.S. housing market, Buffett wrote, "There were three ways to cure this overhang: (1) blow up a lot of houses, a tactic similar to the destruction of autos that occurred with the "cash-for-clunkers" program; (2) speed up household formations by, say, encouraging teenagers to cohabitate, a program not likely to suffer from a lack of volunteers or; (3) reduce new housing starts to a number far below the rate of household formations. Our country has wisely selected the third option."

Buffett also beat up on himself a little in the 2009 epistolary, even though he didn't leave much space to chastise himself after all the lines spent more or less saying everyone on Wall Street deserved to be fired.

Writing about his ill-advised decision to convince insurance subsidiary GEICO to start selling a proprietary Berkshire Hathaway credit card, Buffett admitted that he was not the smartest guy in the room.

"GEICO's managers, it should be emphasized, were never enthusiastic about my idea. They warned me that instead of getting the cream of GEICO's customers we would get the ... well, let's call it the non-cream. I subtly indicated that I was older and wiser. I was just older."

Buffett's age also led him into the realm of medical humor, and maybe, his most late-night-worthy line -- or at least his version of a late-night, lowest-common-denominator one-liner.

In responding to criticism about the price paid in Berkshire Hathaway common shares for the acquisition of Burlington Northern -- especially since Buffett criticized Kraft ( KFT) for attempting to use its stock to buy Cadbury ( CBY) -- Buffett quipped that, "Charlie and I enjoy issuing Berkshire stock about as much as we relish prepping for a colonoscopy."

Maybe Conan O'Brien helped write that one in his time off.

Nonetheless, for the aspiring comedy writers among TheStreet readers, which Buffett quote do you think was 2009's best?

Which Warren Buffett quote do you think was the 2009 report's finest?

Buffett's sly sign-off: "P.S. Come by rail."
Buffett's gastrointestinal humor: "Charlie and I enjoy issuing Berkshire stock about as much as we relish prepping for a colonoscopy."
Buffett almost swears(!): "They warned me that instead of getting the cream of GEICO's customers we would get the ... well, let's call it the non-cream."
Buffett on teen sex: "Speed up household formations by, say, encouraging teenagers to cohabitate."
Buffett meets Tennessee Williams meets Ben Bernanke: "We will never become dependent on the kindness of strangers. Too-big-to-fail is not a fallback position at Berkshire."
Buffett's homage to red-state America: "Sing a country song in reverse, and you will quickly recover your car, house and wife."

-- Reported by Eric Rosenbaum in New York.

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