NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Microsoft ( MSFT - Get Report) rivals have asked for last-minute changes to a proposed settlement with European regulators, giving buyers of computers preloaded with Windows the ability to choose a default browser other than Internet Explorer, according to The New York Times.

Google ( GOOG - Get Report), which offers the Chrome browser, Mozilla, the creator of Firefox, and Oslo-based Opera have come together to ensure that Microsoft does not unfairly influence the Commission's decision, Opera's Chief Technology Officer Hakon Wium Lie told the Times.

The three companies are concerned about Microsoft's browser ballot screen being displayed within Internet Explorer and the plan to alphabetically display the browser options, the newspaper reported. Opera also raised concerns about Microsoft Windows displaying standard warnings when users download non-Microsoft software. The last requirement proposed asks the commission to survey consumer use of the ballot screen more frequently than after two years in order to encourage competition, according to the report.

Quoting data from research firm, Net Applications, the article reported that Internet Explorer has a 67% share of the global browser market, followed by Firefox with 24%, Apple's ( AAPL - Get Report) Safari with 4.4%, Google's Chrome with 3.5%, and Opera with 2%.