The Associated Press

A look at economic developments and activity in major stock markets around the world Friday:

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TORONTO ¿ Canada added a better-than-expected 27,100 jobs in August, one of the biggest gains since the recession began in the country last fall. But according to Statistics Canada, all of the jobs are part-time. The agency said Canada's unemployment rate edged up to 8.7 percent from 8.6 percent in July, as more Canadians began looking for work. Still, the addition of 27,100 jobs is well above the previous month's 45,000 job retreat. The result also beat consensus expectations of a 15,000 job loss last month.

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FRANKFURT ¿ The German services sector saw second-quarter sales fall 11 percent compared with a year earlier as the economic downturn continued to hurt demand. The Wiesbaden-based Federal Statistical Office said strong declines were seen in the business services sector, which saw sales fall 13 percent, while the transport and warehousing sector saw a 12 percent drop compared with the April-June period of 2008. The number of employed in the overall services sector declined by 2.3 percent, with business services jobs falling more than 6 percent and the transport and warehousing sector jobs dropping about 1 percent.

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LONDON ¿ Stock markets mostly rose after official data showed U.S. job losses eased somewhat in August, suggesting the world's largest economy is recovering, although sluggishly. Germany's DAX was up 74.44 points, or 1.4 percent, at 5,375.86, while Britain's FTSE-100 rose 62.32 points, or 1.3 percent, to 4,859.07. France's CAC-40 gained 40.35 points, or 1.1 percent, to 3,593.86. Wall Street rose cautiously at the open, with the Dow Jones industrial average up 25.92 points , or 0.3 percent, at 9,370.53 and the Standard & Poor's 500 index up 3.46, or 0.3 percent, at 1006.70. In Asia, markets earlier closed mostly higher.

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TOKYO ¿ Japanese shares ended slightly lower with few buyers ahead of a key unemployment report in the U.S. and the Group of 20 meeting of top finance officials in London. The benchmark Nikkei 225 index slipped 0.3 percent, or 27.53 points, to 10,187.11. The broader Topix index fell 0.8 percent to 935.74. Many financial shares ended lower. Daiwa Securities Group Inc. ended down 6.1 percent at 508 yen, while Nomura Holdings, Inc. fell 3.7 percent to 755 yen. Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. fell 6.1 percent after saying Thursday it would pay about $2.6 billion to acquire U.S. drug maker Sepracor Inc.

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SHANGHAI ¿ Chinese shares rose again, ending the week unchanged, on rumors that regulators might put off new initial public offerings. The benchmark Shanghai Composite Index edged up 16.58 points, or 0.6 percent, to close at 2,861.61. The Shenzhen Composite Index for China's smaller second exchange rose 1.2 percent to 968.55. Investors were heartened by rumors regulators might put off approving new IPOs, a possible move to shore up sagging prices, analysts said. Investors often are uneasy that a flood of new IPO shares in the market will depress prices.
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