(Updated to add portfolio.)

By Roberto Pedone

PEWAUKEE, Wis. ( TheStreet) -- On Monday's "Mad Money" TV show, Jim Cramer outlined his "Capitalist Manifesto," an eight-point plan to create jobs in the U.S.

Cramer believes his eight-point plan to put Americans back to work could also do a lot to fix health care and protect the environment. His ideas include creating a natural gas pipeline and subsidizing natural gas cars, rebuilding infrastructure like roads and bridges, redeploying all U.S. troops from Germany, South Korea and Japan back to America to work on infrastructure projects, and eliminating any talk of card-check unionization and forced arbitration.

Cramers thinks that if his eight-point plan can be put into action, we might be able to get capitalists across America to unite and start to bring back jobs, earnings power and the troubled housing market.

Recently, Cramer found opportunity in turnaround stocks, stocks that could be great buys during a market selloff and Chinese solar stocks. Here are some Cramer highlights from over the past week as aggregated from his "Mad Money" TV show, the "Stop Trading!" segment on CNBC and his RealMoney blog posts (these blog posts might require a RealMoney subscription).

To read more, visit Stockpickr.com.

-- Written by Roberto Pedone in Pewaukee, Wis.
Stockpickr is a wholly owned subsidiary of TheStreet.com.

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