The Nortel ( NT) saga took another couple of twists this week with Avaya's $475 million bid for the company's enterprise solutions business and revelations about Research In Motion's ( RIMM ) attempt to buy the firm's wireless division.

Finnish firm Nokia Siemens Networks agreed to buy part of Nortel's wireless business for $650 million last month, although RIM is now complaining that it didn't get a fair shot at the assets.

"RIM was told that it could only be qualified as a bidder only if it promised not to submit orders for other Nortel assets for a period of one year," the company said, in a statement. "Despite repeated efforts, Nortel, and its advisors and its court-appointed monitor have rejected repeated attempts to engage in meaningful discussions."

Intriguingly, RIM would have been prepared to pay around $1.1 billion for Nortel's Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) and Long Term Evolution (LTE) businesses, and certain other assets, exceeding Nokia's bid. The Canadian handset giant also played the patriotism card in describing its dealings with Toronto, Ontario-based Nortel.

"RIM is extremely disappointed that Nortel's world-leading technology, the development of which has been funded in part by Canadian taxpayers, seems destined to leave Canada," said Jim Balsillie, RIM's co-CEO, in a statement. "RIM remains extremely interested in acquiring Nortel's assets through a Canadian ownership solution."

The Waterloo, Ontario-based firm also urged the Canadian government to closely monitor the sale, warning that the loss of Nortel's intellectual property could even have national security implications.

Nortel has not yet responded to a request for comment on RIM's complaints from TheStreet.com

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