Socrates once said "all I know is I know nothing." A team of analysts who follow General Electric ( symbol) figured maybe they'd give it a shot.

" In our view, visibility is extremely low across multiple business segments; thus, we have low confidence in our forecast," wrote analysts at William Blair & Company. Lead analyst Jeffrey Germanotta did not return a call or an email message.

I applaud these analysts for their forthrightness, and it is not hard to understand why "visibility" is low, as they put it. GE is a massive, complex company whose executives rarely speak English.

Still, openly admitting you know nothing doesn't seem like the best way to stay employed on Wall Street. Shouldn't they just fake it and repeatedly hedge every statement like all the other analysts?

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