While 15 million Americans are without jobs, and perhaps ready to join another 2 million Americans in foreclosure, don't think they're the only ones with worries.

According to a just-released survey of millionaire households, having what would seem like a nice cushion of $3.5 million in investment assets -- outside a retirement plan and family home -- doesn't make a person immune from anxiety.

The annual Fidelity survey reveals that many millionaires, nearly half of those in the survey, actually don't "feel wealthy" and that they are taking steps to review their financial planning and even adjust their lifestyles.

The average age of those surveyed is 59, and many experienced the previous downturns from the 1970s oil crisis through the deep recession of the early 1980s with its double-digit unemployment rates. Still, 77% of those surveyed said the latest downturn is the "worst economic environment they have experienced."

The survey is done by an independent research firm, and participants don't know the results will be used by Fidelity. But Mike Durbin, president of Fidelity Institutional Wealth Services, notes that of the 4.4 million U. S. households with at least $1 million in assets outside their retirement plans, 37% have at least one account with Fidelity.

Millionaires Generally Optimistic

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the survey is the general level of optimism about the future and the stock market. Even though the survey was taken in late February, before the current market rally began, 39% said they felt confident about investing in the Dow Jones Industrial Average between 7000 and 7999.

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