This post originally appeared on RealMoney on April 28 at 9:10 a.m. EDT. To see Ron Insana's post's in real-time, you can click here to join RealMoney.

The Mamas and the Papas thought, some four decades ago, that Mondays could not be trusted. They sang about how every other day of the week was fine (yeah), but not Monday. And we know why: The weekend was over. It was back to the grind, the salt mine, the office.

But in this secular bear market, that all changed. In the last year, Sundays appear to be the riskiest day of the week, for Wall Street if not for Main Street. In the 25 years that I have participated in the financial markets, I can't recall a time that the "day of rest" was so fraught with risk.

Having cut my teeth in financial news in the 1980s and '90s, I became accustomed to "Black Mondays" and "Turnaround Tuesdays." But in the last 12 months, we have been repeatedly confronted with "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" almost every weekend, when a different financial failure, government edict or natural disaster takes on almost supernatural importance for the markets.

In just the last several weeks, we've had Sundays spoil or threaten the nascent, but very important, rebounds taking place in the financial markets. Those rebounds are of particular importance now because they represent the very necessary preconditions for a sustainable rebound in the real economy.

Despite recent improvements on Wall Street, though, the weekend revelations have threatened to challenge Main Street's ability to reconnect to the stock market's renewed, but cautious, optimism.

Just a few short weeks ago; the Obama administration fired GM ( GM) CEO Rick Wagoner, as the long arm of the government stretched all the way from the Potomac to Pontiac, Mich.

That extremely visible hand putting a steely grip on GM's admittedly wobbly steering wheel smacked not just of too much government interference in business, but of a level of involvement more typical of a president's handlers than of the president himself.

If you liked this article you might like

Fed Must Soothe Market to Sustain Recovery

Fed Must Soothe Market to Sustain Recovery

Wall Street Hypocrisy Invokes Jesus to Justify Bonuses: Opinion

Wall Street Hypocrisy Invokes Jesus to Justify Bonuses: Opinion

Insana: Iran's a Time Bomb

Insana: Iran's a Time Bomb

Insana: Why I Went Fully Into Cash

Insana: Why I Went Fully Into Cash

Insana: A Global Melt-Up

Insana: A Global Melt-Up