LAS VEGAS - Taiwan's HTC makes the first and only Google (GOOG) Android-based smartphone on the market. T-Mobile's G-1 has been pretty successful for everyone involved so far.

But back in February, HTC announced a second Android handset at the Mobile World Congress cellular show in Barcelona. It's called Magic. The first cellular provider to offer the new design will be Britain's Vodafone ( VOD). The handset should start selling within the next few weeks.

First Look: New Google Phone

So far, HTC has made no announcement on whether Magic will ever be available for sale in the U.S. I'm hoping it will. Especially since I was just privy to a personal demonstration of the new phone at the CTIA cellphone show here. From what I saw, this is one killer smartphone.

First of all, you should know that the HTC Magic is a lot like the G-1 it makes for T-Mobile. Then again, it's a lot different too.

The Magic is physically smaller than the G-1. In particular, it's much, much thinner because there's no slide-out QWERTY keyboard under the screen. Magic uses an on-screen keyboard like Apple's ( AAPL) iPhones, Research In Motion's ( RIMM) Blackberry Storm, Sprint ( S) and Samsung's Instinct, Palm's ( PALM) upcoming Pre, Nokia's ( NOK) N97 and others.

Magic measures 4.45 x 2.17 x 0.54 inches and weighs just 4.18 ounces. In its current guise, the Magic is a quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE world phone with HSDPA support for European 3G networks. There's Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and a 3.2 megapixel camera inside. Battery life is said to be up to seven hours of talk and up to 11 hours of standby time per charge. A micro-SD memory card can add up to 16GB of extra storage.

But it was the feel of the phone in my hand, the way the built-in accelerometer made applications and icons float and move on the screen. Just the overall personality of the handset makes the Magic a phone to reckon with.

HTC's boss said recently his company will be producing a number of new Android-based phones for the U.S. market in 2009. I'm hoping that the Magic will turn out to be one of them. It could give some other models a run for their money.

Gary Krakow is TheStreet.com's senior technology correspondent.

More from Technology

How the Public Really Feels About Autonomous Driving Right Now

How the Public Really Feels About Autonomous Driving Right Now

10 Questions for PayPal Ahead of Its Big Investor Day

10 Questions for PayPal Ahead of Its Big Investor Day

China Makes Good on Car Tariff Pledge, Tesla Wins Big

China Makes Good on Car Tariff Pledge, Tesla Wins Big

Venture Capital Funding Surges 49% as Tech Innovation Piques Investor Interest

Venture Capital Funding Surges 49% as Tech Innovation Piques Investor Interest

Venture Capitalists Are Still Feverishly Searching for the Next Facebook

Venture Capitalists Are Still Feverishly Searching for the Next Facebook