Owners of companies of all sizes and industries are concerned about the battle between organized labor and business over the Employee Free Choice Act. Most people think it's a struggle between fat-cat business owners and blue-collar workers who are tired of seeing their jobs shifted overseas and shrinking salaries.

Really, it's a war about power and money -- one that has been going on for over a century. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, workers were taken advantage of by steel mills and coal mines with long hours, poor pay and unsafe conditions. Workers pleaded, but most owners weren't listening. Eventually, the workers rebelled and along came powerful unions.

As time went along, unions started to flex their muscles by pushing for restrictive work rules and striking for more pay, while companies retaliated by closing plants and sending jobs abroad. The average American lost sympathy for unions, as he endured strikes and read about others being paid for not working. Now that greed has consumed both sides, there really isn't any sympathy for either.

The new battle being waged is whether to do away with the secret ballot. Unions organize by getting enough interested workers to vote. Now they want to know how employees voted, which is akin to making presidential election results public. There will be people afraid to vote against unionization.

Why are unions taking this approach? For years, companies had the right to try to convince employees that unionization was a bad idea. There would be threats of job losses, etc. What does this mean for small to medium-size businesses?

If you liked this article you might like

Small Biz: 9 Books to Read Before the Recovery

Nine Books to Read Before the Recovery

Nine Books to Read Before the Recovery

Seven Elements You Need to Sell Ideas

Seven Elements You Need to Sell Ideas

A Twitter Primer for Small Business

Twitter Tips for the Engaged Entrepreneur

Twitter Tips for the Engaged Entrepreneur