For example, I would save $25 a year by replacing the bulb in the ceiling light in my home office with a CFL. We save another $34 by using five halogen bulbs instead of conventional ones in our den. Halogens give off a lot of heat when they're used, and so aren't nearly as efficient at CFLs -- our savings would be almost $80 with those twisty bulbs. But they're still an improvement over conventional bulbs and work in places where CFLs might not, like in reading lamps or over bathroom mirrors.

The group also offers guidelines for choosing and making the best use of CFLs in your home.

If you're still using old-style bulbs throughout your house, give the EWG's guide a few minutes of your time and pick up some CFLs. In this recession and bear market, that lower electric bill could offer one financial bright spot this year.
Eileen P. Gunn writes about the business of life and is the author of "Your Career Is An Extreme Sport." You can learn more about her at her Web site.

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