Diversity is the key to surviving downturns.

In the course of one week, the Cowboys lost cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones to an indefinite suspension for an off-the-field incident and quarterback Tony Romo to an injury for four weeks.

However, despite these losses, the Cowboys have strong assets in wide receiver Terrell Owens and running back Marion Barber, who has struggled as of late but is solid in the backfield. In addition, when the team most needs a boost, it is getting an infusion of new blood.

This week the team traded for wide receiver Roy Williams. The Cowboys sent a first-round draft pick, a third-rounder and a sixth-rounder to the Lions in exchange for Williams and a seventh-rounder. The move should immediately help the team weather its recent on-the-field and off-the-field storms.

Terrell Owens has been in a slump, as he has drawn extra attention from opposing teams' defenses. Williams should draw attention from the Cowboys' opponents, opening up T.O. more. The addition also creates a potential long-term solution at wide-out for the Cowboys. T.O. is a special player, but who knows how long he will want to play or how long he will be able to play? Williams is younger and should help the Cowboys over the short term and long term. He is 26 years old and in his prime.

Diversifying a team is one thing. Diversifying a portfolio is another. Today I am looking at International Business Machines ( IBM). The company makes and develops information technologies, including computer systems, software, networking systems and storage devices.

The stock was trading at $92 recently, down about 1.8%, in early afternoon trading. It's up a few bucks from its 52-week low of $85.51, which it hit on Oct. 10. The stock has shed 21.74% in the last year and is a far cry from its 52-week high of $130.93.

The return on equity for this stock is a whopping 50.63%. It has revenue of $104.3 billion and $9.85 billion in the bank. That will allow the company to continue to grow and will give it more options in a down market. Additionally, its operating cash flow is $18.09 billion. The forward price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is 9.8, which means Wall Street has dramatically undervalued this stock. Lastly, it has a price/earnings-to-growth (PEG) ratio of just 0.96, which is a very attractive metric.

Giving me further confidence in my pick is that Jim Cramer's view reinforces my own. I believe IBM is a keeper that will help me be successful when going long.

Keep moving the chains.

At the time of publication, Brown had no positions in stocks mentioned, although positions may change at any time.

Tim Brown played 16 seasons in the NFL, where he made nine Pro Bowls. After a brief stint with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004, Brown retired as an Oakland Raider. He was a Heisman Trophy winner in college for Notre Dame.

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