U.S. Stocks Set to Continue Their Rally

Premarket futures were indicating stocks on Wall Street would continue their rally Tuesday, as the Treasury Department plans to announce an investment of $125 billion in nine large U.S. banks.

Futures for the S&P 500 were up 13 points to 1030 and were 23 ahead of fair value. Nasdaq futures were better by 15 points at 1473 and were 34 above fair value.

On Monday, stocks snapped back from their eight-session October losing streak with massive gains. The Dow registered its largest-ever gain in terms of points, rising 936 points, or 11%. The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq each jumped 12%. The large gains came as central banks around the world collaborated on plans to inject capital into the global financial system.

Ahead of the new session, the Wall Street Journal reported that the Treasury was preparing to dedicate $250 billion of the $700 billion bailout package to buying equity positions in U.S. banks.

The government would buy preferred shares in Goldman Sachs ( GS), Morgan Stanley ( MS), JPMorgan Chase ( JPM) , Bank of America ( BAC), Merrill Lynch ( MER) , Citigroup ( C), Wells Fargo ( WFC), Bank of New York Mellon ( BK) and State Street ( STT), the Journal reported.

Goldman Sachs was undertaking some of its own maneuvers, seeking a New York state charter for its new banking subsidiary. Goldman, along with Morgan Stanley, became a bank holding company on Sept. 21. Many major commercial banks apply for charters from federal rather than state regulators.

Elsewhere in the financials, Hank Greenberg, former CEO of AIG ( AIG), was preparing a proposal to keep the company from being taken over by the government. AIG is rushing to pay back a bridge loan from the government to avoid being seized.

If you liked this article you might like

China's Banks Halt Business With North Korea Per United Nations Sanctions

Why Hurricanes Won't Force the Fed to Ditch a December Rate Hike

Fed Pares $4.5 Trillion Balance Sheet But Easy-Money Era Isn't Over

Bank Stocks Move Higher as Fed Decides to Start Unwinding Balance Sheet

Cramer: Goldman's Downgrade Of J&J Is 'Questionable'