Investing is serious business, and it can be life-changing. It is filled with complex decisions that can make or lose a person a lot of dough. For many, the decisions they make now regarding the stock market will have a direct impact on their lifestyle later in life.

It's very important stuff we're dealing with here, and I take it very seriously. Packaging the picks with interesting anecdotes or my perspective about current events in football is a way for me to show you part of my thought process. Football has been such a big part of my life that it does creep into many of the things that I do.

Today, I want to share my perspective on Jeremy Shockey, a very valuable asset to have on your team. Has there ever been a tight end more perfect for New York than Jeremy. His whole persona says NEW YORK!

But Jeremy no longer plays for the New York Giants -- he was traded to the New Orleans Saints for a second and a fifth round draft choice. Shockey, a big, loud, heart-on-your-sleeve type of player was sidelined during the Giants' playoff run. He broke his leg in December.

You will hear Shockey say the trade was "the best thing for me." When your team wins the Super Bowl and you are not on the field, in fact, they even asked for you not to be on the sideline for the game, it may really be time to go.

There comes a time in every player's career when he has to make tough decisions. Whether those decisions are about retiring or moving to another team, it's heart-wrenching to be in that position. Sure, you will hear players who have been there say: "I will not have any trouble adjusting to another city."

Take it from me, the toughest decision I ever made while playing football was the decision to leave the Raiders. No matter how I tried to justify the move in my mind, my body literally trembled with the mere thought of playing football for a team other than the Silver and Black. Making the move to another team (Tampa Bay) was something I had to do. To retire when you are not ready leads you to pull a Brett Favre!

Jeremy will excel in New Orleans -- he is a very valuable player to have on your team. He is young and will be the missing cog in an already explosive offense. Plus he is playing with one of the more innovative coaches in the league. The Giants' organization has placed a huge chip on Jeremy's shoulders; the NFC South better watch out.

I think Jeremy will be a force no matter the environment.

For today's play, I like Automatic Data Processing ( ADP).

ADP provides technology-based outsourcing solutions to employers, vehicle retailers and manufacturers. It has three segments: employer services, professional employer organization services and dealer services. The employer services area handles a number of human resources functions, payroll, benefits administration, etc.

It has 46,000 full-time employees. In general, ADP's success is tied to the health of the economy. The economy isn't all that healthy and has definitely been hurting lately. Some see more pain in the future, while others say we've seen a good chunk of the bad times.

I will tell you this, I think things will eventually get better, and that makes ADP a strong long-term play.

The company dominates its market. It was pushing $50 back in November.. It's lost more than 10% of its value in the last year and yesterday it closed at $41.31.

I like its industry position and its price, and I like a lot of what I see on its balance sheet. It has revenue of $8.57 billion, operating cash flow of $1.48 billion and $1.68 per share in cash. It has a forward price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 17.16, which could be lower, but is still good. And it has institutional support -- 78% of the stock is owned by institutions. The higher the percentage, the more stable the stock is considered because institutional owners are generally viewed as buy-and-hold investors.

Whether the market goes up or down in the near term, I think this is a great long-term play.

Keep moving the chains!

At the time of publication, Brown had no positions in stocks mentioned, although positions may change at any time.

Tim Brown played 16 seasons in the NFL, where he made nine Pro Bowls. After a brief stint with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004, Brown retired as an Oakland Raider. He was a Heisman Trophy winner in college for Notre Dame.

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