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Jim Cramer returned to his "new tech" thesis, highlighting battery maker EnerSys ( ENS) on his "Mad Money" TV show Tuesday. Cramer said it's companies like EnerSys that are solving the world's problems -- and hold the greatest investment potential.

EnerSys is the world's largest manufacturer of industrial batteries. The company's products can be found in forklifts and in mining and railroad equipment. EnerSys also has a backup power division that provides emergency power for telco and other infrastructure companies.

However, Cramer said the real potential of EnerSys lies in its proprietary Thin Pure Plate Lead (TPPL) battery technology. Using this technology, EnerSys is manufacturing batteries that run longer with less maintenance and come in smaller packages. Cramer said these batteries could soon replace traditional lithium-ion batteries used in hybrid cars.

EnerSys' TPPL business currently only accounts for 10% of the company's sales, but with demand outstripping supply, Cramer sees the technology playing a much bigger role for the company in the future. EnerSys, he said, is also in a position to pass most of its rising commodity costs directly onto the consumers, helping its bottom line.

Shares of EnerSys have been up big since the company preannounced a better-than-expected quarter, but Cramer said with its recent pullback Wednesday, now is the perfect time to buy into the long-term potential of EnerSys. "EnerSys," he said, "is your new tech battery play."

Housing Help

Cramer welcomed Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd to the show to discuss the anti-foreclosure bill working its way through Congress. The bill, which now heads to the full Senate for a vote, would offer federal assistance to homeowners via the Federal Housing Authority (FHA), letting them refinance their homes at affordable rates.

Cramer called the bill "the beginning of the end of the housing crisis," and commended Dodd for his involvement. Dodd explained that under the plan, at-risk homeowners would simply need to contact their banks and initiate the process. Once qualified, the FHA would allow for refinancing at reasonable rates and back the loans so they get approved in a timely fashion.

Dodd also explained that the bill reforms the country's affordable housing program and offers reforms to both Fannie Mae ( FNM) and Freddie Mac ( FRE). One thing not included in the bill is a $600 billion tax credit for home builders, which Dodd said he didn't support.

According to Dodd, between 9%-12% of all the homes in the U.S. are now in a situation where debt exceeds the value of the home. He said that the last thing homeowners want are foreclosures on their street holding down home prices. "The heart of the problem is housing, and the heart of the housing problem is foreclosures," said Dodd.

Stockpickr

When asked why it took so long to act on the housing crisis, Dodd explained that many in Congress shy from the word "bailout", but he explained that this bill isn't a bailout, but rather a much needed and long-overdue assistance for the victims of what he called rampant mortgage fraud.

Am I Diversified?

Cramer played "Am I Diversified?" with callers to see if their portfolios have what it takes. The first caller's portfolio included US Steel ( X), GrafTech ( GTI), Gran Tierra Energy ( GTE), Trinity Industries ( TRN) and Owens-Corning ( OC). Cramer said this portfolio was too weighted in steel, and recommended selling GrafTech and buying a health-care company.

The second caller's top holdings included Berkshire Hathaway ( BRKB), ConocoPhillips ( COP), Dow Chemical ( DOW), Goldman Sachs ( GS) and Itron ( ITRI). Cramer said he was in love with this portfolio and wouldn't make any changes.

The third caller had Yamana Gold ( AUY), Goldman Sachs, Starbucks ( SBUX), EMC ( EMC) and Disney ( DIS) as their top five stocks. Cramer said this portfolio also had a perfect combination of stocks.

Mad Mail

In the "Mad Mail" viewer feedback segment, Cramer told a viewer that he had been considering DeVry ( DV) as a possible recommendation, but accounting issues always equals "sell" in his book.

Sudden Death

In Sudden Death, Cramer was bullish on Frontline ( FRO).

Cramer was bearish on Ford Motor ( F) and Teekay Tankers ( TNK).

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on CSX Corp ( CSX), McMoRan Exploration ( MMR) and Cleveland-Cliffs ( CLF).

Cramer was bearish on USEC ( USU), Sara Lee ( SLE), Nordstrom ( JWN), Crown Holdings ( CCK) and Symantec ( SYMC).
Jim Cramer writes about all the stock trades in his charitable trust for TheStreet.com in Action Alerts Plus. Recent stocks he's traded in this account include Schering-Plough (SPG), Yamana Gold (AUY) and Abbott Laboratories (ABT).

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For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round, click here .
At the time of publication, Cramer was long EMC, ConocoPhillips, Goldman Sachs and Yamana Gold.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for Action Alerts PLUS. Watch Cramer on "Mad Money" weeknights on CNBC. Click here to order Cramer's latest book, "Mad Money: Watch TV, Get Rich," click here to order his book, "Real Money: Sane Investing in an Insane World," click here to get his second book, "You Got Screwed!" and click here to order Cramer's autobiography, "Confessions of a Street Addict." While he cannot provide personalized investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to send comments on his column by clicking here.

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