Many people, especially mobile executives, are obsessed with security. Protection of the home, car and personal identity top the list of concerns. Gadget Grrl brings you items that keep people away from your private information, and one that stores your personal data to share with medical pros. These gadgets were hot items at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show.

Zoombak
$249.99 + Service
zoombak.com

Zoombak is both a GPS Car & Family locator. Mobile executives could use this device to assist in finding their cars if stolen. Place the small, 2.5 oz. device on your vehicle, like inside the trunk, and then activate the perimeters of a virtual boundary. A virtual boundary is something you set up online. And once you determine the boundaries, you'll be notified via text message or email if and when your vehicle goes outside of those boundaries.

And by logging on to Zoombak.com, you can track in real-time the location of your vehicle and/or when it has arrived at the designated location, which could help if you've got sensitive documents that need to be hand delivered. The service also offers a 24/7 toll-free phone number to call and speak with a live operator. There are two service plans available: one costs $14.99/month and another called "Pay Up Pay Less" starting at $9.99/month.

Fingerprint Recognition Door Lock
$299
iTouchless.net

If you've got an office or a room that needs extra security, installing the iTouchless Fingerprint Recognition Door Lock might help you worry less about security. When I saw the demo at CES, I thought this could be useful to mobile executives who own a SOHO, small office/home offices, and don't want children, neighbors or friends to have access to their work areas.

How it works is that you slide the cover up, this activates the biometric reader. You then depress your index finger on to the blue light fingerprint reader. The reader will store up to 150 fingerprints per Door Lock. You also have the option of using up to 78 different passcodes or two backup keys.

Of note here is that if a thief doesn't know that the cover slides up on the lock, it might deter him or her entirely, due to the extra time needed to figure out how to gain access. You could eliminate the keys to your home or office entirely by installing these on the doors. Powered by 4 AA batteries, it is supposed to cover 15,000 entrances per door.

Identity Pal
$39.95
identitypal.com

As it's name implies, this small USB drive stores your Identity, which could include medical history, allergies and insurance.

Say, for example, you're on the road and you are in an accident. A medical technician could take this device, put it in any PC (MAC versions are not currently available) and retrieve information that would help treat you, the patient.

This is sort of a cheesy (and much less expensive) version of a microchip.

It's up to you how much or little information you want to load on to the drive. One of the ways this could be used is on diabetics, asthmatics or anyone with a medical condition that could be in a possition where they are unable to talk. This device could save time over and above the standard medical bracelet worn by some people with such conditions, because it could provide instant access to a medical history.

Site to See: Darkreading.Com

Can printers be vulnerable to spam? Find out on this security obsessed site. Look up current fixes for Quicktime, find out what the heck a Botnet is and see who's protected and who's in trouble.
Diana Forbes is a Los Angeles-based writer and media personality. Her "Gadget Grrl" reviews appear in various national print and online publications, and she demonstrates consumer products on national and local television shows. Click here to visit her Gadgetgrrl Web site.