You can see why the clients are fleeing. Henry had a magical touch in the markets throughout the '80s and '90s. But ever since the late fall of 2004, it has all turned to ashes.

Has anyone seen Bill Buckner?

Since Nov. 1, 2004, Henry's main fund, Strategic Allocation, has plunged by nearly a third. If you'd invested $1,000 at that moment you'd have watched in horror since as it shrank to just $670, according to the company's own Web site.

The figure for the Standard & Poor's 500 index: Nearly $1,400.

Twice as much.

Over the same period, Henry's GlobalAnalytics fund has turned $1,000 into just $800, compared to $1,700 and change in the MSCI EAFE international equities index.

And his financials and metals portfolio has also lost a fifth of its value.

Henry even closed his original investment fund, which he had traded successfully since the early 1980s, after it suffered three years of heavy losses.

To be fair, he's not alone. Like most traders, Henry and his firm are basically chartists ... trying to divine trends from financial charts so they can jump on board.

"Eighty percent of the world's traders are probably trend followers," says Jonkheel. The problem, he says, is that prices have been whipsawing around instead of moving in longer trends. Suddenly, the charts don't work the way they used to.

If you liked this article you might like

European Central Banks Blew It With Gold

European Central Banks Blew It With Gold

Bookies: Thompson Out, Rudy and Mitt Tops

Bookies: Thompson Out, Rudy and Mitt Tops

$1,000 Google? Sure, but Why Bother?

$1,000 Google? Sure, but Why Bother?

Nothing Constant at Fidelity but Change

Nothing Constant at Fidelity but Change

Citi's Fat Cats Take a Drubbing in Decline

Citi's Fat Cats Take a Drubbing in Decline